Dolores Water Conservancy District

April 10, 2014--Snowpack not enough to keep lower Dolores River running for recreation (Durango Telegraph)

For the second year in a row, it’s just not enough. McPhee Reservoir near Dolores has enough water to meet its basic obligations, but not enough for those looking to enjoy whitewater boating in the lower Dolores River. “There’s a lot of disappointed boaters,” said Lee-Ann Hill, program coordinator for the Dolores River Boating Advocates.


April 7, 2014--McPhee breakwater plan stalls (Cortez Journal)

It was supposed to be floated into position last summer, but a new breakwater system for the McPhee Reservoir boat launch is still lying on shore. Engineering snags for the structure’s anchor design have delayed the project indefinitely, according to officials with Montezuma County and the San Juan National Forest.


Dolores Water Conservancy District, by Michael Preston

There is a lot going on these days that could affect the Dolores Project and many recent events have received newspaper coverage.

March 19, 2014--Totten revived for irrigation (Cortez Journal)

A experimental irrigation program using Totten Reservoir is helping out McElmo Canyon farmers. The small lake, east of Cortez, is owned by the Dolores Water Conservancy District. But there has not been much irrigation use for it since the installation of the Towaoc Highline Canal.


March 18, 2014--Recent storms improve reservoir forecasts (Cortez Journal)

The news continues to improve for irrigators planning for this year’s crops season, thanks to recent snowstorms. The Dolores Water Conservancy District, which operates McPhee Reservoir, forecasts full-service users will receive at least 15 inches per allocated acre of the 22 inches of a full contractual amount.


February 20, 2014--Protecting McPhee Reservoir is goal of water managers (Cortez Journal)

There is a lot going on these days that could affect the Dolores Project and many recent events have received newspaper coverage. This column is intended to put these events into a broader context that will help those who are interested understand what is going on as this story continues to unfold.


January 31, 2014--Board votes to raise Lower Dolores flow (Cortez Journal)

A spirited debate before the Colorado Water Conservation Board in Denver Tuesday featured local officials expressing their opinions on a plan to increase flows on the lower Dolores River.


January 13, 2014--Plans for Dolores River draw criticism (Cortez Journal)

Federal and state protection measures for the Lower Dolores River were sharply criticized by local officials Thursday during a regional water meeting in Cortez. But public land agencies and the Colorado Water Conservation board defended the decisions as part of their job to inventory special waterways and insure adequate flows on the river.


After Half a Century City of Cortez Point of Diversion Change

Cortez’s water rights date back to 1892, when the Dunham & Johnson Ditch, Giogetta Ditch, Illinois Ditch, and Sheek Ditch were decreed for irrigation on the Dolores River above the town of Dolores.

Wild and Scenic Status for Lower Dolores River?

According to an early July Cortez Journal article, McPhee Reservoir managers are concerned that more sections on the lower Dolores River are becoming eligible for a national Wild and Scenic River status.

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