Water Rights

November 19, 2015--Colorado's Water Plan will need everyone to pitch in, officials say (Denver Post)

Colorado adopted a landmark $20 billion water plan Thursday to try to accommodate rapid population growth by conserving more, re-using more, storing more, sharing more between farmers and cities — and diverting less west-east across mountains. "Now is the time to re-think how we can be more efficient," Gov.

November 10, 2015--Water rights stakeholders able to reach settlement in Animas - La Plata Project (Durango Herald)

A collective sigh of relief was let out in 6th Judicial District Court on Monday after a settlement was reached by several local agencies with a stake in the water rights of the Animas-La Plata Project stored in Lake Nighthorse. Chief District Judge Gregory Lyman will review the details of the settlement in the coming weeks, and the court will reconvene 1:30 p.m. Dec.

September 21, 2015--State agrees to improve flows on Lower Dolores (Durango Herald)

Colorado’s top water board agreed Tuesday to improve flows on the Lower Dolores River to boost the health of the river and its native fish. The Colorado Water Conservation Board will seek an in-stream flow right of up to 900 cubic feet per second on the Lower Dolores below its confluence with the San Miguel River. In-stream flows are designated by the board to preserve an

August 1, 2015--Colorado farmers grow more food on less water amid rising competition (Denver Post)

While farmers around him give up control over water used for a century to irrigate crops, Marc Arnusch is crouching in a thick cornfield inspecting blue digits on his new sensor. The third-generation farmer installed it to measure exactly the level of moisture in soil right at the roots of his corn. He's also considering underground tubes that emit water only upon contact by roots.

July 17, 2015--Water rights
 bill by Tipton
 passes House (Grand Junction Sentinel)

A packet of measures that included U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton’s bill to protect state-issued water rights against federal demands passed the U.S. House on Thursday. The Western Water and American Food Security Act, H.R. 2898, passed the House on a 245-176 vote and now goes to the Senate.

July 10, 2015--It's about to get easier for California farmers to conserve water—and sell it (CityLab)

There’s no “solving” California’s drought, as so many headlines suggest. Drought is a regular feature of the Western climate cycle.

July 6, 2015--Colorado joins suit against federal water regulations (Grand Junction Sentinel)

Thirteen states, including Colorado, are challenging a federal regulation defining “waters of the United States.” The suit, filed in Bismarck, North Dakota, federal court, contends the Environmental Protection Agency’s new far-reaching rule violates the Clean Water Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, and the U.S.

July 1, 2015--In drying Colorado River Basin, Indian Tribes are water dealmakers (Circle of Blue)

Mired in drought and torched by one of the hottest years ever measured, the seven states of the Colorado River Basin are acutely aware of how a desert can bully water supplies. They are not alone.

California Water Rights Exceed Supply

Among other serious water challenges, UC Davis researchers have found that in the last century, California has handed out rights to five times more surface water than their rivers produce even in a normal year. On some major river systems (i.e., the San Joaquin Valley), people have rights to nearly nine times more water than flows from the Sierra mountains.

June 17, 2015--The Colorado River is not a water buffet. So why the 'first come, first serve' policy? (Guardian)

As water shortages grip California and the seven state Colorado River basin, many users feel no pain, while some face a complete curtailment. That’s because the water management system is not designed to be either efficient or equitable but consistent and predictable.

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