Water Quality

July 20, 2014--U.S. water quality: No day at the beach (Denver Post)

What do you pack for a day at the shore? How about a hepatitis shot, antibiotic ointment, and a vomit bucket? A study conducted by the environmental organization NRDS found that as many as 10 percent of U.S.


Warmer Temperatures Expedite Hybrid Trout Takeover

When two species mate, their offspring end up with new names like ‘pizzly’ (a grizzly and polar bear pairing) or ‘sparred owl’ (for barred owl and spotted owl hybrids). According to a June High Country News article, the more rare species in such couplings face a far worse fate--hybridization can be a path to extinction.


June 23, 2014--849,610 pounds of toxic chemicals released into Colorado waterways (Denver Post)

Industrial polluters released 849,610 pounds of toxic chemicals into Colorado waterways in 2012, according to a report drawn from federal data. The most prevalent chemical — nitrates — causes algae growth that leads to dead zones in rivers and streams.


June 23, 2014--Our survival depends on the health of the oceans (Washington Post)

Humanity depends on the oceans, but their worsening state gets little attention. Good for Secretary of State John F. Kerry, then, for trying to elevate the issue last week in an international oceans conference in Washington.


June 19, 2014--Not much love for proposed new water diversions (Summit Voice)

For all the detailed information in the 16,000-page study for Denver Water’s proposed new water diversions from the Western Slope, there are still more questions than answers, according to formal comment letters filed in the past few weeks.


June 16, 2014--Human activities increase salt content in many of the nation’s streams (USGS)

Concentrations of dissolved solids, a measure of the salt content in water, are elevated in many of the Nations streams as a result of human activities, according to a new USGS study. Excessive dissolved-solids concentrations in water can have adverse effects on the environment and on agricultural, domestic, municipal, and industrial water users.


June 14, 2014--CSU to study water quality impacts of beetle kill (Coloradoan)

Colorado School of Mines have begun a five-year study of the impacts beetle kill forests have on water quality in Colorado. The study, funded by a $3 million grant from the National Science Foundation Water Sustainment and Climate Program, will look at the South Platte and Colorado River basins.


June 13, 2014--The promise of waterless dyeing (Environmental News Network)

One of the world's most polluting industries is the textile-dyeing sector, which in China and other Asian nations releases trillions of liters of chemically tainted wastewater. But new waterless dyeing technologies, if adopted on a large scale, could sharply cut pollution from the clothing industry.


May 27, 2014--How healthy is the Animas River? (Cortez Journal)

The swiftly flowing Animas River ran turbid here Monday, but that was the least of Melissa May’s concerns as she dipped water samples to be analyzed for various qualities. The main focus of the San Juan Watershed Group research is E. coli and nutrients – nitrogen and phosphorus. Certain strains of the former can cause nausea, fever and vomiting.


May 26, 2014--Water concerns could limit US oil, gas development, speakers say (Oil & Gas Journal)

The oil and gas industry needs to respond more effectively to public concerns about safe water supplies if it expects to realize US unconventional resources’ full potential, speakers at Deloitte LLP’s 2014 Washington Energy Conference warned.


Syndicate content