Totten Reservoir

March 19, 2014--Totten revived for irrigation (Cortez Journal)

A experimental irrigation program using Totten Reservoir is helping out McElmo Canyon farmers. The small lake, east of Cortez, is owned by the Dolores Water Conservancy District. But there has not been much irrigation use for it since the installation of the Towaoc Highline Canal.


March 6, 2013--Fish stocked in southwest Colorado reservoirs early (Cortez Journal)

Colorado Parks and Wildlife recently stocked rainbow trout in three reservoirs in southwest Colorado and fishing should be excellent at those locations. The reservoirs are Totten Reservoir - 5,000 fish, just east of Cortez; Summit Reservoir, - 5,000 fish, located about 8 miles northwest of Mancos on Colo.


February 10, 2012--Agencies plan study of mercury levels in fish (Durango Herald)

Concerns about mercury contamination in fish have prompted various agencies to take action toward better understanding the problem. The Southwestern Water Conservation District and the U.S. Geological Survey have scheduled a meeting next month to lay the foundation for a study.


November 19, 2011--Utes wish for water (Cortez Journal)

In an effort to ensure water resources for agricultural production, the Ute Mountain Ute tribe wants to purchase more water rights from the Dolores Water Conservation District. A letter requesting the increase was sent to the conservation district in early October.


April 5, 2009--Mercury mystery in state waters (Denver Post)

The idyllic scene — calm, slate-blue waters fringed by evergreens and snow — belied the problem: a build-up of dangerous mercury in the reservoir's walleye. The heavy metal, however, isn't found in fish in all lakes or all species in tainted lakes — a phenomenon in Colorado and in other parts of the country.


April 5, 2009--Mercury mystery in state waters (Denver Post)

The idyllic scene — calm, slate-blue waters fringed by evergreens and snow — belied the problem: a build-up of dangerous mercury in the reservoir's walleye. The heavy metal, however, isn't found in fish in all lakes or all species in tainted lakes — a phenomenon in Colorado and in other parts of the country.


April 5, 2009--Mercury mystery in state waters (Denver Post)

The idyllic scene — calm, slate-blue waters fringed by evergreens and snow — belied the problem: a build-up of dangerous mercury in the reservoir's walleye. The heavy metal, however, isn't found in fish in all lakes or all species in tainted lakes — a phenomenon in Colorado and in other parts of the country.


April 5, 2009--Mercury mystery in state waters (Denver Post)

The idyllic scene — calm, slate-blue waters fringed by evergreens and snow — belied the problem: a build-up of dangerous mercury in the reservoir's walleye. The heavy metal, however, isn't found in fish in all lakes or all species in tainted lakes — a phenomenon in Colorado and in other parts of the country.


April 5, 2009--Mercury mystery in state waters (Denver Post)

The idyllic scene — calm, slate-blue waters fringed by evergreens and snow — belied the problem: a build-up of dangerous mercury in the reservoir's walleye. The heavy metal, however, isn't found in fish in all lakes or all species in tainted lakes — a phenomenon in Colorado and in other parts of the country.


April 5, 2009--Mercury mystery in state waters (Denver Post)

The idyllic scene — calm, slate-blue waters fringed by evergreens and snow — belied the problem: a build-up of dangerous mercury in the reservoir's walleye. The heavy metal, however, isn't found in fish in all lakes or all species in tainted lakes — a phenomenon in Colorado and in other parts of the country.


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