Invasive Species


The Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers! campaign is designed to address the multiple challenges of an environmental issue known collectively as aquatic nuisance species. Invasive species represent one of the greatest threats to quality fisheries.

Invasive Species

For more information on this important topic, visit some of the following websites:

Don't Move a Mussel! 

Protect Your Waters

The 100th Meridian

May 14, 2015--Gov. Hickenlooper signs bill to fight invasive, thirsty plants (KVNF)

House Bill 1006 creates the Invasive Phreatophyte Grant Program. Governor John Hickenlooper signed the bill at a ceremony in Montrose on Tuesday. "Phreatophytes are those trees and Russian olive or tamarisk that just suck up water," said Hickenlooper.

April 7, 2015--‘New and improved’ Navajo Lake boat ramp opens (Pagosa Daily Post)

After undergoing major repairs, the boat ramp at Navajo State Park is now open to the general public for boat launching. The boat ramp was resurfaced and extended another 300 feet into the reservoir. “This will be a huge improvement for our park users,” said Doug Secrist, park manager.

Conservation: Projects Aim to Remove Salt Cedars Along the Colorado and Verde Rivers

The growth of invasive salt cedars within the flood plains of the Verde River in Arizona has become a serious impediment to the flow of water into the Colorado. Extracting salt cedar from riverbeds and replacing it with native grasses is an enormous undertaking, but one that could have a dramatic impact on Colorado River water flows. At least that is part of the thinking behind conservation projects proposed to repair habitats along both of the rivers. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack recently announced three such conservation projects as part of a $1.2 billion, five-year enterprise included in the massive 2014 farm bill. About 35 percent of the overall funding will be dedicated to projects such as this along the Colorado River.

March 1, 2015--McPhee Reservoir at risk of mussel invasion (Associated Press)

The non-native quagga and zebra mussels are wreaking havoc on reservoirs in California, Arizona, and Nevada, clogging reservoirs and substantially increasing maintenance costs. Larvae can survive in water on boats that then infect other lakes. Annual tests show McPhee has tested negative so far for the mussels. According to the Cortez Journal, concerns rose after the U.S.

February 7, 2015--Aerial survey shows pine beetles waning, but spruce beetles continue to spread across Colorado forests (Summit Voice)

There’s good news and bad news from Colorado’s forests. Mountain pine beetle activity has faded to the lowest level since 1996, but spruce beetles continue to spread in the San Juans and in northwestern Colorado. The spruce beetle outbreak was detected on 485,000 acres in 2014, compared to 398,000 acres across the state in 2013, according to the U.S.

February 1, 2015--California drought creating serious water-weed problems (Seattle Times)

Over the past several months, a thick carpet of green has spread across many Delta harbors and even open channels, making them the latest victims of California’s drought.

January 20, 2015--Not a water cure-all, but definitely the right steps (Arizona Central)

Water conservation in an age of drought can take a lot of forms, one of which is returning watersheds and forests to a more traditionally natural condition — a condition that sucks up a lot less water. That is part of the thinking behind conservation projects proposed to repair habitat along the Verde and Colorado rivers, which should improve the flow of water in the Colorado

January 14, 2015--McPhee at risk for invasive species (Dolores Star)

Colorado Parks and Wildlife, the U.S. Forest Service, the Dolores Water Conservancy District, and local municipalities all have a common enemy - the invasive zebra and quagga mussel species.

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