Efficiency

Colorado WaterWise Value of Water Toolkit is Now Available!

Colorado WaterWise Value of Water Toolkit is now available! It has evolved into the new Colorado Water – Live Like You Love It program.

***Help Save the Colorado River: Pledge Now to the Change the Course Campaign!***

The freshwater team at National Geographic believes the principle of motivated individual action can help to restore the flow of the Colorado River.  Together with the Bonneville Environment Foundation and Participant Media, National Geographic has created the “Change the Course” campaign.


Water Use Audits Offered to Farmers!

Farmers consume nearly 90 percent of Colorado's water, and Colorado State University is offering ways for them to use it more efficiently. A grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to CSU's Center for Agricultural Energy will pay for reduced-cost irrigation efficiency audits for growers with center pivot systems.


October 16, 2016--Hawaii water utility finds $56 million in energy savings (Water Online)

As cash-strapped utilities look for ways to save money, some savvy water executives are hoping to streamline the inefficiencies in their energy bills as a way to rein in costs. That’s the strategy underway at the Honolulu Board of Water Supply, which supplies water to about 1 million people.


October 14, 2016--New study suggests water conservation remains the cheapest alternative (Ink Stain)

A new study published last week by Heather Cooley and colleagues at the Pacific Institute concludes that water conservation remains the cheapest water supply alternative as compared to the big new sources widely discussed, things like storm water capture, desalination, and recycling/reuse.


June 13, 2016--Making water conservation a reality (Post Independent)

In issuing his executive order back in 2013 for the creation of the first statewide water plan, Gov. John Hickenlooper stated that “every conversation about water should begin with conservation.” It may be difficult to think of water conservation now as we look out our windows at rivers and creeks swollen with spring runoff, but we need to remind ourselves of where we live.


April 30, 2016--Heller, Reid announce adoption of measure to dddress Western drought conditions (PoliticalNews.me)

U.S. Senators Dean Heller (R-NV) and Harry Reid (D-NV) released the following statement after the Senate adopted the Reid-Heller Water Management Amendment to the Energy and Water appropriations bill.


March 23, 2016--Colorado bird health an indicator of water quality for humans (Daily Summit)

The growing water issues and shortages throughout the western United States stand as a notable threat to the way of life for millions of Americans but could also pose just as significant a hazard for hundreds of native species of birds. Tuesday marked World Water Day, an observance by the United Nations of water issues impacting the world over that dates to the early- ’90s in order t


Homes to Recycle Water

Droughts have pushed cities, especially in the American Southwest, to strengthen efficiency mandates at every point in the water system. According to a recent Energy Collective article, Lancaster, California was one of the first municipalities to require homes to be not only solar-ready, but have recycle-ready plumbing. Innovative companies have developed systems that recycle the gray water in the home for non-potable uses (e.g., outside irrigation, toilet water, etc.). According to the article, more than 80 percent of the water used in the typical home is not used for drinking, and technology is now available that can recover 2 of every 3 gallons of a home’s gray water. Generally, these types of systems can cut the total amount of water used by a home by about one-third. 


Colorado’s Buy-and-Grow vs. Buy-and-Dry Program

Agricultural buy-and-dry occurs when someone purchases land and moves the water into the municipal system. There are mounting fears, however, that permanent dry-up of agricultural lands could potentially cripple the farming industry in Colorado. Alternatively, a buy-and-grow plan would allow farmers to share their water rights with municipalities--essentially a sharing of water rights between rural and urban communities. According to a recent Durango Herald article, with the buy-and-grow plan governments and private interests could help farmers with investments in water-conservation technology and other equipment, thereby helping farmers grow. The farmers would then share the water that they don’t need anymore because of the savings. In the article, Kelly Brough said that “They’re still growing, still producing, they’re more efficient, and they don’t lose their water right.” Brough is the Chief Executive of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce (DMCC). At an early October meeting in Denver with state and local water officials, hosted by the DMCC, Brough indicated that the buy-and-grow plan could usher in a new wave of water policy. To view the full article visit the Durango Herald


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