Precipitation

February 19, 2015--In S.W. Colo., snowpack slips (Durango Herald)

Snowpack in Southwest Colorado is perilously low, averaging only 56 percent in an index of the San Miguel, Dolores, Animas and San Juan River basins on Wednesday. The basin index measures snowpack at U.S. Department of Agriculture sites around the region. The snowpack at the summit of Wolf Creek Pass was at only 46 percent of the median figure for the date.


February 5, 2015--Below-normal Colorado snowpack raises water supply concern (Colorado Public Radio)

The Natural Resources and Conservation Service released its latest snow survey Thursday"Looking back at Colorado’s mountain snowpack over the course of January, it is becoming increasingly difficult to find promising water supply outlooks for spring and summer 2015,&quo


January 30, 2015--World's cities experiencing more heatwaves, study shows (Guardian)

World cities are experiencing more heatwaves and fewer cold spells, according to a study of extreme temperatures in hundreds of urban areas over the past 40 years. It found that many cities are seeing fewer extremely windy days than in the 1970s and have more extremely hot individual days and nights.


January 30, 2015--Unusually high temperatures, low snow pack could spell trouble for Utah’s water needs (Fox 13)

Five degrees for six months: Those are numbers that cause serious concern for Utah water experts. Brian McInerney, Hydrologist for the National Weather Service, said from August through January, northern Utah has averaged temperatures five degrees higher than normal. “Which is incredibly significant when you talk about snow pack,” McInerney said.


January 30, 2015--Scientists see shrinking California snowpack as a harbinger (Los Angeles Times)

State workers performed a California winter ritual Thursday, poking hollow aluminum tubes into Sierra Nevada meadows to measure the snowpack. In what scientists see as a harbinger, they didn't find much. "We will conceivably see more years like this in the future," said geologist Jeffrey Mount, a senior fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California.


January 27, 2015--Why bigger snowstorms come with global warming (Inside Climate News)

As the oceans warm due to the burning of fossil fuels, the atmosphere above can hold more moisture, which in turn fuels the creation of the most intense precipitation events. The mid-Atlantic is currently 2 degrees Fahrenheit above normal. In the spring, summer and fall, that translates into more of the most intense rainstorms.


January 27, 2015--California water shortage: $1 billion plant will make seawater drinkable by end of 2015 (Los Angeles Times)

While much of California remains in the grip of a three-year drought, a $1 billion desalination plant that will turn seawater to drinking water is on track to open later this year to serve residents of San Diego County. Once running, the plant will be the largest of its kind in the Western Hemisphere.


January 14, 2015--Now is the time for national water resource policy (Huff Post)

Water is our most precious natural resource and, yet, we abuse it and fail to effectively manage it. The Center for Neighborhood Technology, a not-for-profit organization based in Chicago that focuses on sustainable cities, estimates that the loss of water from our municipal distribution systems approaches 2.1 trillion gallons per year.


January 9, 2015--Overall, Colorado’s snowpack is on target (Durango Herald)

As a whole, Colorado’s snowpack was right where it should have been Jan. 1 – standing at 99 percent of the median for the date, the Natural Resources Conservation Service said in a news release.


January 1, 2015--No doubt it's a climate-change drought, scientists say (Tech)

It was raining in San Francisco on the damp December morning that three scientists gathered at  the offices of Climate Nexus to hold a press conference about the drought. It had been raining regularly for more than a week, in fact, and Stanford University had just recorded its rainiest day ever on campus.


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