Precipitation

May 28, 2015--Extreme rainfall becoming more common, new analysis finds (Huff Post)

As floodwaters ravage Texas and Oklahoma, a new analysis finds that heavy downpours have increased dramatically since 1950. And scientists project that precipitation patterns will become increasingly erratic as the climate changes. The Northeast had a 31 percent increase in heavy downpours between the 1950 to 1959 period and the 2005 to 2014 period.


May 27, 2015--Durango records wettest May on record; more rain is likely (Durango Herald)

It’s not just your imagination – Durango already has experienced its wettest May in at least 16 years, and more rain may be on the way. By Tuesday, 2.9 inches of precipitation had fallen at Durango-La Plata County Airport. Records at that location date to 2000. The second-wettest May came in 2011, when 1.29 inches fell.


May 22, 2015--‘Miracle May’ for Colorado 
water levels (Grand Junction Sentinel)

May showers are bringing a respite for Colorado River water managers worried about keeping enough water in Lake Powell to generate electricity. “This May has really been a miracle in Colorado,” said Eric Kuhn, general manager of the Colorado River Water Conservation District, Thursday at the Mesa County State of the Rivers discussion at the Avalon Theatre in Grand Junction.


May 15, 2015--El Niño near-certain to last through summer: U.S. climate center (Reuters)

The El Niño climate phenomenon is almost certain to last through the Northern Hemisphere summer, the U.S. weather forecaster said, raising the chance of heavy rain in the southern United States as well as South America, and scorching heat in Asia that could devastate crops of thirsty food staples like rice.


May 15, 2015--Southwest reservoirs play catch-up (Durango Herald)

Colorado is slogging through a wetter-than-normal spring, with heavy rain restoring much-needed moisture to parched rangeland and sending some rivers over the banks. But the precipitation isn’t helping dry downstream states in the Southwest that rely on the Colorado River, which originates in western Colorado. The U.S.


May 4, 2015--Western towns hard-hit by climate change unite, target coal for funds (Denver Post)

Ten Western mountain towns feeling the effects of climate change are launching a campaign that targets the coal industry, seeking hundreds of millions of dollars a year from companies to help communities adapt.


April 15, 2015--Study says global warming will bring drought to western U.S. sooner rather than later (Summit Voice)

The western U.S. will likely be one of the first places to experience unprecedented drought driven by climate change, according to new research by scientists with the Vienna-based International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis.


April 10, 2015--Major water woes looming in the West (Summit Voice)

Federal water watchers say their April 1 readings show that precipitation thus far in the 2015 water year (beginning October 1, 2014) is now below normal over most of the West except for some northwestern areas and coastal Alaska. Snowpack has declined significantly since last month throughout the West due to the warm and dry March.


April 3, 2015--Hydropower could be risky bet in warming world (Climate Central)

As investments in wind and solar power climb, backing major hydropower projects may be seen as a risky bet in a warming world, as studies show that reservoirs may be major sources of methane emissions and climate change itself could make rain and snowfall less certain in some regions.


April 2, 2015--Colorado House votes to allow rainwater collection (Bloomberg Business)

Colorado’s House of Representatives has approved a bill that would end the nation’s only ban on homeowners collecting rainwater. If signed into law, the measure would allow for the personal collection of as much as 110 gallons.


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