Prior Appropriation

September 6, 2016--Colorado’s water engineer discusses wasting of state’s precious resource (Aspen Daily Times)

Dick Wolfe, Colorado’s state water engineer, told a group of irrigators here last week that it’s illegal for someone to take more water than they need because they are speculating on the future potential value of their water rights. Wolfe was one of several guest speakers at the Uncompahgre Valley Water Forum, which was held on Sept.


May 7, 2016--“Prior appropriation is a doctrine of scarcity” — Greg Hobbs (Pueblo Chieftain)

If there was a message, it was: Water is everything and it starts here. Retired Colorado Supreme Court Justice Greg Hobbs held the Arkansas River Basin Water Forum captive for about an hour with a mix of photos that ranged from historic images to family photo albums and a collection of historic maps, which he once owned but has donated to the Supreme Court. His narrative wove a tale o


February 5, 2016--The right to waste water: In the west, water users forced to use it or lose it (Pro Publica)

High in the Rocky Mountains, snowmelt fills a stream that trickles down into Ohio Creek and then onward toward the Upper Gunnison River.


January 18, 2016--Rain barrel proposal drizzles down on Colorado Legislature (Durango Herald)

Another attempt to allow Coloradans to collect rain water that falls on their roofs has started with a drizzle of legislation. Reps.


Prior Appropriation System Test Projects

Colorado water rights owners are testing the state's prior appropriation or "use it or lose it" rule that penalizes those who divert less than their full allotment from rivers, thereby opening a potential path to cut water use as shortages continue throughout the American West. For 139 years, state enforcers have said farmers, cities and ranchers who don't use all the water they are entitled to could have their rights curtailed. Critics have said that discourages conservation. A first deal in the works, made possible by a 2013 law, lets a ranch owner near Granby leave water in Willow Creek, a tributary of the Colorado River, without facing penalties. A second deal would leave more water in the Roaring Fork River, another Colorado River tributary, in Aspen. Colorado Farm Bureau (CFB) leaders said they're watching to make sure water left in rivers by those who don't exercise their senior rights stays available to next-in-priority irrigators. "We're definitely taking a wait-and-see approach," CFB president Don Shawcroft said.


September 28, 2015--State Supreme Court Justice gives overview of water law (Pine River Times)

Hobbs addresses Water 101 seminar in Bayfield: Two­thirds of the water that originates in the Colorado mountains must go to downstream states and Mexico, recently retired State Supreme Court Justice Gregory Hobbs noted at the Water 101 seminar on Sept. 25 at the Pine River Library in Bayfield.


July 10, 2015--It's about to get easier for California farmers to conserve water—and sell it (CityLab)

There’s no “solving” California’s drought, as so many headlines suggest. Drought is a regular feature of the Western climate cycle.


June 17, 2015--The Colorado River is not a water buffet. So why the 'first come, first serve' policy? (Guardian)

As water shortages grip California and the seven state Colorado River basin, many users feel no pain, while some face a complete curtailment. That’s because the water management system is not designed to be either efficient or equitable but consistent and predictable.


June 16, 2015--Colorado cuts into use-or-lose system that caused water waste (Denver Post)

Colorado water rights owners are forging a way out of the state's ingrained "Use It Or Lose It" rule that penalizes those who divert less than their full allotment from rivers — opening a path to cut water use as shortages grip the West. For 139 years, state enforcers have said farmers, cities and ranchers who don't use all the water they are entitled to could have


May 23, 2015--The winners and the losers of the California water crisis (Science Daily)

A recent article published in Local Environment highlights the widening gap of inequality between the wealthy and the poor of California, specifically in relation to the State's current drought. The authors, Stephanie Pincetl and Terri Hogue, discuss what has caused these inequalities to expand -- the outdated and unsupervised water regulations still currently used,


Syndicate content