Natural Resources Conservation Service

May 21, 2016--White House drought strategy will help Southwest (Pueblo Chieftain)

Drought has taken a record toll on the western United States. The 16-year drought we are experiencing (with no end in sight) affects millions of Americans and poses a serious threat to local communities. From farmers who need water to irrigate crops to families that rely on healthy waterways for jobs and recreation, to wildlife and ecosystems — nearly everyone and ev


March 1, 2016--State snowpack in retreat (Grand Junction Sentinel)

That taste of spring that western Coloradans have enjoyed for the past few weeks has taken a toll on the state’s snowpack. Blue skies and warm days have contributed to Colorado’s snowpack falling to below normal, at 98 percent of median as of Monday, according to Natural Resources Conservation Service data. That comes after what had been a strong start for snowfall accumul


February 2, 2016--Above normal snowpack in some of last winter's driest regions

Above normal snowpack measurements are tracking for most of the West. The season was off to a slow start with sporadic storms October through December, but January winter precipitation increased measurements across all states,according to the Natural Resources Conservation Service’s SNOTEL sites, which measure snow depth at thousands of stations nation-wide.


May 5, 2015--Colorado begins $3.4 million effort to save ag water, use it to make power (Denver Post)

Colorado is embarking on a federally backed $3.4 million experiment to transform the flood irrigation farmers use to grow crops: tapping diverted water more efficiently and generating electricity.


Evans Selected USDA’s Colorado NRCS State Conservationist

Clint Evans, Assistant State Conservationist for Operations in Idaho, was recently selected as the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service’s (NRCS) State Conservationist in Colorado. “It’s an exciting time,” shares Evans.  “I’m looking forward to this opportunity to work with the NRCS employees, conservation partners, landowners and land managers across the state.” Evans started his career with NRCS in 2000, but his first experience with the Agency was in the late 1990s while working on the ranch where his then employer enrolled in the Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP).  As a result, Evans gained experience in conservation planning and practice implementation thru financial assistance programs from the customer’s perspective.  He enjoyed working with the NRCS field staff so much that he decided to pursue a career with the Agency. After his tenure as a technician, Evans served in two Kansas field offices, was promoted to District Conservationist in Kingman, Kansas, moved to the Kansas State Office where he served as a Resource Conservationist on the programs staff, and then was selected as Idaho’s Assistant State Conservationist for Programs in 2009. He transferred to serve as Idaho’s Assistant State Conservationist for Operations in 2013. Additionally and in cooperation with his permanent assignments, Evans served on numerous details in other states and Washington, DC. Evans attended Kansas State University where he studied animal science, agri-business, and agronomy earning a Bachelor of Science Degree in Agriculture. 


April 2, 2015--Colorado mountain snowpack low at 69 percent, raising water concerns (Denver Post)

Colorado's mountain snowpack is running low — around 69 percent of average — raising concerns about low streamflow during summer and potential strain on water supplies. A relatively hot, dry March took a toll, melting away snowpack from 87 percent at the end of February.

January 9, 2015--Overall, Colorado’s snowpack is on target (Durango Herald)

As a whole, Colorado’s snowpack was right where it should have been Jan. 1 – standing at 99 percent of the median for the date, the Natural Resources Conservation Service said in a news release.


June 6, 2014--Lake Powell rising a foot every day (Deseret News)

A big snowpack that is being eaten away by high temperatures is causing the water at Lake Powell to rise a foot a day — good news for boaters and other water revelers. "This is a good year to boat at Lake Powell," said Paul Ostapuk, a spokesman for Friends of Lake Powell.

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