U.S. Geological Survey

September 5, 2014--Melting permafrost could worsen water quality in the Rockies (Colorado Independent)

We may not yet know exactly how global warming will affect all the complex parts of Rocky Mountain ecosystems, but it’s not for lack of trying.


August 29, 2014--Greenhouse gas buildup ‘loads the dice’ for Southwest megadroughts (Summit Voice)

Tree ring records clearly show that the southwestern U.S. experienced megadroughts long before the anthropogenic global warming era. One such decades-long dry spell may have been a factor in the collapse of the Anasazi civilization at Mesa Verde.


August 25, 2014--Study: All kinds of nasty stuff in the water (Summit Voice)

Water quality experts with the U.S. Geological Survey say chemicals from pharmaceuticals and personal-care products are widespread in water that has passed through landfill waste.


July 29, 2014--Groundwater pumping causes ground to drop (Press-Enterprise)

Creating a lush, artificial oasis in the Coachella Valley has siphoned away so much underground water that the land above it is sinking. Land surfaces declined nine inches to two feet in some areas of Palm Desert, Indian Wells, and La Quinta between 1995 and 2010 because so much groundwater was being pumped from the aquifers beneath, according to a 17-year study done by the U.S.


July 29, 2014--Midwestern waters are full of bee-killing pesticides (Mother Jones)

The US Environmental Protection Agency has been conducting a slow-motion reassessment of a widely used class of insecticides, even as evidence mounts that it's harming key ecosystem players from pollinating bees to birds.


July 19, 2014--About the Ogallala (Kansas Agland)

The Ogallala Aquifer - a nearly 174,000-square-mile underground cache of water that spreads across parts of Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota, Texas and Wyoming - is one of the largest freshwater aquifers in the world.


July 11, 2014--Loss of snowpack and glaciers in rockies poses water threat (Environment 360)

When Rocky Mountain explorer Walter Wilcox hiked up to Bow Summit in Canada’s Banff National Park in 1896, he took a photo of a turquoise lake that later caught the eye of a National Geographic magazine editor. In the photo, which was eventually published, the glacier feeding the lake was just a mile upstream.


June 30, 2014--Movement of carbon in large U.S. rivers affected by reservoirs, finds study (Water World)

A new study conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists, and published in the Journal of Geophysical Research – Biogeosciences, has found that a combination of climate and human activities (diversion and reservoirs) controls the movement of carbon in two large western river basins, the Colorado and the Missouri Rivers.


June 16, 2014--Human activities increase salt content in many of the nation’s streams (USGS)

Concentrations of dissolved solids, a measure of the salt content in water, are elevated in many of the Nations streams as a result of human activities, according to a new USGS study. Excessive dissolved-solids concentrations in water can have adverse effects on the environment and on agricultural, domestic, municipal, and industrial water users.


June 6, 2014--Climate change expedites hybrid trout takeover (High Country News)

When two species mate, their offspring end up with undignified new names like ‘pizzly’ (a grizzly and polar bear pairing) or ‘sparred owl’ (for barred owl and spotted owl hybrids). But the more rare species in such couplings face a far worse fate – hybridization can be a path to extinction.


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