U.S. Geological Survey

July 19, 2014--About the Ogallala (Kansas Agland)

The Ogallala Aquifer - a nearly 174,000-square-mile underground cache of water that spreads across parts of Kansas, Texas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota, Texas and Wyoming - is one of the largest freshwater aquifers in the world.


July 11, 2014--Loss of snowpack and glaciers in rockies poses water threat (Environment 360)

When Rocky Mountain explorer Walter Wilcox hiked up to Bow Summit in Canada’s Banff National Park in 1896, he took a photo of a turquoise lake that later caught the eye of a National Geographic magazine editor. In the photo, which was eventually published, the glacier feeding the lake was just a mile upstream.


June 30, 2014--Movement of carbon in large U.S. rivers affected by reservoirs, finds study (Water World)

A new study conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists, and published in the Journal of Geophysical Research – Biogeosciences, has found that a combination of climate and human activities (diversion and reservoirs) controls the movement of carbon in two large western river basins, the Colorado and the Missouri Rivers.


June 16, 2014--Human activities increase salt content in many of the nation’s streams (USGS)

Concentrations of dissolved solids, a measure of the salt content in water, are elevated in many of the Nations streams as a result of human activities, according to a new USGS study. Excessive dissolved-solids concentrations in water can have adverse effects on the environment and on agricultural, domestic, municipal, and industrial water users.


June 6, 2014--Climate change expedites hybrid trout takeover (High Country News)

When two species mate, their offspring end up with undignified new names like ‘pizzly’ (a grizzly and polar bear pairing) or ‘sparred owl’ (for barred owl and spotted owl hybrids). But the more rare species in such couplings face a far worse fate – hybridization can be a path to extinction.


May 31, 2014--Colorado landslides expected to be on rise in this wet year (Denver Post)

The massive, deadly landslide on the Grand Mesa has turned new attention to the unpredictable nature of the state's mountainous terrain in a year expected to see much more soil, rock and mud tumbling down across Colorado.


May 19, 2014--The two sectors that suck up most of our water (Wall Street Journal)

In the U.S., we tend to react to drought by focusing on obvious symbols of water consumption, like golf courses, swimming pools and lush green lawns. If we’re serious about saving water, though, we need to focus on the places where we use the most of it: our food and energy systems. According to the U.S.


April 23, 2014--Mercury in fishes from 21 national parks in the Western United States (USGS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has released a new report on mercury in fish. Here is the abstract: Mercury (Hg) is a global contaminant and human activities have increased atmospheric Hg concentrations 3- to 5-fold during the past 150 years.


February 26, 2014--Water declining in western Kansas (Hutchinson News)

Clay Scott is fighting dust. The western Kansas landscape is thirsty. Yet little relief has fallen from the sky. “We’re fighting the drought,” the Grant County farmer said, adding that the little residue he had on his fields is nearly gone.


January 1, 2014--Online water resources tool sheds light on U.S. waterway conditions (Water World)

A new online fact sheet published by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides one-stop information on the organization's data sources for waterways across the United States. The database comprises information on the nation's streams, groundwater and water-quality.


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