Hickenlooper

***Public Input Sought for Colorado Water Plan!***

As an essential resource, water supports the open space provided by the state’s productive ranches and farms, brings us recreational activities such as boating and fishing, is the source of high quality drinking water for our growing towns and cities, and provides life to the beautiful environment that surrounds us. 


December 14, 2014--Colorado needs this water plan (Times Call)

If the value of water to Colorado's future was ever in doubt — and, no, it never was — then the recently released draft of a state water plan should make clear just how important this resource is, from Denver to Durango. Prepared for Gov.


December 13, 2014--Colorado's Water Plan is a big step forward (Denver Post)

No single issue will have a more direct impact on Colorado's future than our ability to successfully and collaboratively manage our life-giving water. Water pumps the beating heart of Colorado's sublime appeal. It provides for thriving agriculture, the green hue of our forests, farmfields and, yes, even lawns.


December 12, 2014--State water plan: New Colorado River diversion possible (Sky-Hi News)

Western Slope water interests still reeling from the Gross Expansion Project may barely have enough time to catch their breath before they’re again summoned to the bargaining table. The Colorado Water Conservation Board presented the first full draft of its 2014 Colorado Water Plan to Gov. John Hickenlooper on Wednesday, Dec.


December 10, 2014--Colorado water plan draft goes to Hickenlooper to address shortfall (Denver Post)

Gov. John Hickenlooper on Wednesday received a draft water plan that he requested to help Colorado confront challenges including a 163 billion-gallon projected shortfall. The Colorado Water Plan, written by the Colorado Water Conservation Board, reflects efforts to sustain a growing economy and population expected to double to 10 million by 2050.


December 9, 2014--With future uncertain, Colorado shields its water (ABC News)

With demand increasing across the West, Colorado is drawing up a strategy to keep some of the trillions of gallons of water that gushes out of the Rocky Mountains every spring ? most of which flows downstream to drought-stricken California, Arizona, Nevada and Mexico.


December 9, 2014--Southwest Basin Water Roundtable holds meetings to discuss plan (Cortez Journal)

Colorado has a difficult water problem. Eighty percent of its water is on the Western Slope, but 80 percent of its population is on the Front Range. Adding to the problem are estimates that Colorado’s population will increase from 5 million to 10 million by 2050, the majority of which will live on the Front Range.


December 8, 2014--Colorado's first water plan 'a good first step' (Denver Business Journal)

The final draft of Colorado's first formal water plan will be delivered to Gov. John Hickenlooper this week, and it's being characterized by water experts as a "good first step" toward building state-wide consensus on what can and must be done to meet the needs of a growing population.


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