Water-Energy Nexus

October 16, 2016--Hawaii water utility finds $56 million in energy savings (Water Online)

As cash-strapped utilities look for ways to save money, some savvy water executives are hoping to streamline the inefficiencies in their energy bills as a way to rein in costs. That’s the strategy underway at the Honolulu Board of Water Supply, which supplies water to about 1 million people.


October 15, 2016--Is using less water the secret to cutting our greenhouse gas emissions? (Guardian)

When most of us think of slowing global warming, we think of reducing car exhaust and power plant emissions – limiting activities that involve combusting fossil fuels.


August 24, 2016--The water-energy nexus is not what you expect (Green Biz)

Saving water saves energy, but there are more reasons to save water. Earlier this summer, researchers at UC Davis confirmed what a lot of us already know — that saving water saves energy.

Water-Energy Nexus

The interdependencies between water and energy, the water-energy nexus, is becoming more prominent. Water is used in all phases of energy production and energy is required to extract, convey, and deliver water. Yet, several trends are adding stress to the water-energy nexus, namely climate change and population growth. According to the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Water-Energy Nexus: Challenges and Opportunities report, power generation and agriculture-related are the largest users of water in the U.S. However, water withdrawals have been steadily decreasing due to a number of factors, predominantly reduced supplies, while growth in the two fore-mentioned sectors have been steadily increasing.


July 7, 2015--Mapping drought's impact on electricity generation (High Country News)

The water-energy nexus spans the world of electricity generation and water movement, particularly in Western states. It takes water to produce steam for coal, natural gas and nuclear power plants, and they usually need water to cool them down.


Power Production Cuts of California Dams Due to Drought

According to a mid-May Los Angeles Times article, Shasta Dam, looming more than 600 feet tall and gatekeeper of the largest man-made lake in California, was designed to perform two crucial functions: Store water and generate power. And for decades, the massive concrete structure has channeled water to cities and farms while generating up to 710 megawatts of hydropower, enough to provide electricity for more than 532,000 homes. But amid four years of drought, the reservoir is drained to 50% of capacity, cutting the dam's power production by about a third, according to federal reclamation officials.


January 1, 2015--The story of water, energy, and food lives here (Circle of Blue)

There’s no pretending that providing secure stores of fresh water, and producing adequate supplies of energy and food is confounding the nations of Earth. In the era of climate change most of the world’s prominent energy and food producing regions are either getting dryer or more hydrologically unstable.


US-China Pact Includes Water-Energy Research Provisions

In November, President Obama and President Jinping of China announced new targets for reducing the amount of heat-trapping gases that their countries release into the atmosphere. This was a historic move that both sides hope will catalyze a global climate agreement in Paris next year to rein in carbon emissions and avoid harmful ecological changes. The two powers will work together in several areas of shared interests. They will collaborate to develop technology that pulls carbon out of the air, work on urban planning ideas, welcome trade delegations for green technology, and test new solar energy facilities. The agreement also expands the mission of a joint energy research program to include, for the first time, investigations of the connections between water and energy use.

Syndicate content