Nature Conservancy

May 8, 2015--Dolores River conservation group has successful 2014 (Telluride Daily Planet)

In a presentation to the San Miguel County Board of Commissioners at their meeting Wednesday, Nature Conservancy Southwest Colorado Project Director Peter Mueller updated the board on the work of the Dolores River Restoration Partnership, a private-public partnership that works to preserve the wildlife and ecology of the river that starts in the San Juan Mountains and runs to its confluence wit


December 22, 2014--Making water conservation pay (Eco Business)

Call it a sign of the times. Rarely a month passes in which a water crisis does not make headlines somewhere in the world. In early August, an algal bloom in Lake Erie, the result of agricultural runoff, contaminated drinking water in Toledo, Ohio.


December 18, 2014--MillerCoors, Pepsi, Wells Fargo donate $1M to Colorado forests (Denver Business Journal)

The money will help pay for the nonprofit to spend three years designing, implementing, and measuring the progress of forest restoration projects intended to "improve water security" for the Denver metro area and also reduce the threat of catastrophic wildfires.


September 27, 2014--3 ways to save Arizona's water supply (Arizona Central)

We are benefiting now from past strong water planning and leadership. Today we need more creative thinking and action to avoid water shortages that will come. Demand for water in the seven-state Colorado River basin now exceeds supply. Much of the water actually leaves the Colorado basin to places like Denver, Los Angeles, San Diego and Salt Lake City. The drought only makes it worse.


September 25, 2014--Water groups fund Dolores fish habitat (Cortez Journal)

Trout Unlimited and The Nature Conservancy are working to improve fish habitat and riparian health on the upper and lower Dolores River. Matt Clark, director for the Dolores River Chapter of Trout Unlimited, is organizing a project to install a fish passage and improved diversion dam at the Redburn Ranch north of Dolores.


May 25, 2014--Can US eliminate invasive species by eating them? (Washington Post)

 It seems like a simple proposition: American lakes, rivers and offshore waters are filling up with destructive fish and crustaceans originally from other parts of the world, many of them potential sources of food. So why not control these invasive populations by getting people to eat them?


April 1, 2014--San Miguel tributary flowing free (Telluride Daily Planet)

In the 1930s, a 6-foot-tall, 60-feet-wide diversion dam was built in Tabeguache Creek, just upstream from its confluence with the San Miguel River, for the purposes of providing water to the Town of Uravan. That dam remained for roughly 80 years, even as the uranium mining town was abandoned, declared a Superfund Site and razed in a reclamation project.

January 23, 2014--Colorado continues to wrangle over last drop (Durango Telegraph)

The Colorado River drains the western slope of Colorado’s rockies, where 80 percent of the state’s snow falls. But about 80 percent of Colorado’s population lies east of the Continental Divide, along the Front Range. Unallocated water may still exist, especially in the Yampa River downstream from Steamboat Springs.


July 16, 2013--Experts to testify at Colorado River supply gap Senate hearing (Northern Colorado Business Report)

Two Colorado water experts will testify Tuesday before the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Water and Power to discuss increasing demand on the Colorado River. Reagan Waskom, director of the Colorado Water Institute at Colorado State University, and Taylor Hawes, director of the Nature Conservancy's Colorado River Program in Boulder, will testify on the U.S.


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