Executive Order

June 19, 2015--State's first-ever water plan in homestretch (Colorado Statesman)

Bring up the topic of Colorado water just about anywhere across the arid state, and before long someone is bound to invoke the state’s unofficial motto, a saying attributed to Mark Twain: Whiskey is for drinking.


June 1, 2015--‘Where’s the beef’ in Colorado’s water plan? (Colorado Independent)

The first draft of Colorado’s new water plan offered plenty of background information about the state’s water, but didn’t say exactly what can be done to avoid a looming water-supply gap. By 2050, the state could be short billions of gallons per year — twice as much as Denver now uses annually.


May 31, 2015--Extra water savings likely addition to State Water Plan (KUNC)

Colorado's water plan will probably include additional conservation measures from cities and industrial users. That's what members of the state's Interbasin Compact Committee agreed to at a meeting May 20. The specifics are still being worked out, but the added conservation could save 400,000 acre-feet of water.


May 1, 2015--A draft of Colorado’s proposed water plan may not be trickling down to the people? (Colorado Independent)

Water fights run deep in this state, and officials long avoided drafting a plan for what to do about it. But Gov. John Hickenlooper knows avoidance is no longer an option; water is running out. As Colorado’s population rises, the gap between supply and demand is expected to grow to millions of gallons of water per day by 2050.


March 28, 2015--Colorado's Water Plan close, but not there yet (Denver Post)

In December, Colorado will issue a comprehensive state water plan. The importance of this endeavor cannot be overstated: If done well, it can measurably improve our use of water and help to strengthen our quality of life and economy. This initiative is unprecedented, daring to go where previous efforts have failed.


February 21, 2015--Ciruli: It's Colorado's move on water planning (Denver Post)

Colorado's statewide water planning is overdue. California and Texas, the nation's two largest states and users of Colorado headwaters, have moved well ahead of the state in planning and investment. Both downstream states are facing major shortages.


February 12, 2015--Colorado water plan can’t create more H20 (Aspen Daily News)

Gov. John Hickenlooper recently received the initial draft of the Colorado Water Plan. This “plan” has been in the making since the drought year of 2002, and it’s not over yet. Work on the plan, including public input, will continue through the coming year, with the final version due to the governor in December 2015. The Colorado Water Plan in many ways is indeed historic.


February 8, 2015--Water plan must focus on conservation, not diversion (Post Independent)

Until 50 years ago, dams and water diversions were seen by many as symbols of progress, ingenuity and man’s triumph over nature. By 1970 we had built 100,000 dams in rivers and creeks across the country, and their negative impacts — on fish, wildlife, wetlands, recreation and communities — were becoming increasingly visible.


January 19, 2015--Bumpy route for moving water (Pueblo Chieftain)

Can the Western Slope ever come to terms with a future proposal to move water across the Continental Divide? That’s one question that is emerging as the state water plan moves into its sophomore year. Part of the draft water plan presented to Gov. John Hickenlooper in December includes principles for Colorado River Development.


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