Buy and Dry

September 4, 2016--Auction opens window on buy-and-dry practices (Post Independent)

Few things are more valuable to a farmer in the arid West than irrigation water. Without it, the land turns back into its natural state: dry, dusty plains. If a fast-growing city is your neighbor, then your water holds even more value. Farm families in Western states like California and Colorado are increasingly under pressure to sell their water.


August 4, 2016--As thirsty cities drive up water's price, can farms survive on the Front Range? (KUNC)

Few things are more valuable to a farmer in the arid West than irrigation water. Without it, the land turns back into its natural state: dry, dusty plains. If a fast-growing city is your neighbor, then your water holds even more value. Farm families in Western states like California and Colorado are increasingly under pressure to sell their water.


October 9, 2015--Business leaders pitch water sharing between urban, rural communities (Durango Herald)

Business leaders Thursday said they hope to replace the practice of “buy-and-dry” with “buy-and-grow,” a plan that would allow farmers to share their water rights with municipalities. The idea was proposed at a meeting in Denver with state and local water officials, hosted by the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce. Kelly Brough, chief executive of the chamber, sa


June 24, 2015--Water Lines: Colorado water leaders set ambitious conservation goals (Grand Junction Press)

Discussions and disputes over how to meet the water needs of Colorado’s growing population typically revolve around the proper balance between taking additional water from agriculture, taking additional water from the West Slope to the Front Range, and conservation. Conservation would seem to be the low-hanging fruit, but the nuts and bolts of how to conserve enough to avoid more tra


June 8, 2015--Can leasing irrigation water keep Colorado farms alive? (High Country News)

Statewide, cities have acquired at least 191,000 acre-feet of agricultural water, eliminating farming and ranching on millions of acres. Water managers estimate Colorado could lose up to 700,000 more acres by 2050.


April 18, 2015--Booming cities, taxed rivers, and tumbleweeds frame Colorado's water plans (Colorado Public Radio)

On a recent Friday, farmer Dale Mauch climbed down into a dry ditch of the Fort Lyon Canal, which feeds Arkansas River water to his farm. He explained that two days ago, this ditch in Prowers County was clear of weeds. Then a cold front moved in. “In 10 minutes, it can do this,” he said, standing near tumbleweeds that come up to his chest.


December 20, 2014--Can a Water Plan Actually Work? (Denver Magazine)

On a bright Friday morning in September, James Eklund, executive director of the Colorado Water Conservation Board, is dressed in a gray suit and a pink shirt to deliver his pitch to the men and women of the Public Affairs Council of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, across town from his office.


December 8, 2014--Farming in America shifts as cities buy up rural water rights (Water Online)

Water challenges may be shifting the landscape of U.S. agriculture. "As we continue to push Western water supplies beyond their limits, growing cities are gradually idling farmland to meet their own water needs.


November 26, 2014--Statewide water plan taking shape (Pine River Times)

Prospects are for the state's population to double by 2050, while the state's water supply does not increase - and it could even decrease with climate change. That's driving creation of the Colorado Water Plan, which was initiated in May 2013 by an executive order from Gov. John Hickenlooper.


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