Water Research Foundation

August 28, 2014--New report covers wildfire impacts on water supplies, potentials for mitigation (Water World)

Throughout the last several years, there has been an increase in the frequency of severe wildfires across North America, ultimately raising concerns about the impacts on local natural resources such as water.


July 27, 2014--How Southern Nevada could turn water deficiency into economic boon (Las Vegas Sun)

On a ribbon of road two miles beyond Henderson, at the base of the mountains leading to Lake Mead, scientists peer through microscopes searching samples of water for microbes and chemicals. They’re looking for new ways to clean and conserve water. In the process, they’re also helping to spawn an industry to power Las Vegas’ economy.


November 25, 2013--Study helps water utilities prepare for, respond to wildfires (Water Research Foundation)

Water Research Foundation (WRF) completed a new study, “Effects of Wildfire on Drinking Water Utilities and Best Practices for Wildfire Risk Reduction and Mitigation” (project #4482).


March 12, 2012--Climate: South Platte flows could drop by 40 percent (Summit Voice)

A new study by the Water Research Foundation projects potential climate change impacts to Front Range water supplies for the next few decades, showing that the total amount of water in several key river basins could decline significantly if temperatures continue to rise.


October 26, 2011--Water use growing twice as fast as population! (Environmental News Network)

Like oil in the 20th century, water could well be the essential commodity on which the 21st century will turn. Human beings have depended on access to water since the earliest days of civilization, but with 7 billion people on the planet as of October 31, exponentially expanding urbanization and development are driving demand like never before.


April 5, 2010--Water bills go up in down economy as usage drops (Denver Post)

The grim economy is hitting some consumers in the wallet in yet another way: their water bills. Many water utilities are raising rates because water use is down, in part because manufacturers have closed or are cutting back, tourism has fallen and the real estate market is in the doldrums. This is happening most everywhere.


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