Forests

July 13, 2015--When a tree falls in the forest, what’s the impact on water resources? (phys.org)

Forest management practices such as cutting or thinning trees reduce the risk of wildfires, and enhance the overall health of the woodlands. However, they also can speed up the pace of snow melt, which in turn may increase erosion and destabilize streams.


March 30, 2015--Glimpses of the future: Drought damage leads to widespread forest death (Science Daily)

The 2000-2003 drought in the American southwest triggered a widespread die-off of forests around the region. A Carnegie-led team of scientists developed a new modeling tool to explain how and where trembling aspen forests died as a result of this drought. It is based on damage to the individual trees' ability to transport water under water-stressed conditions.


March 22, 2015--Why Denver spends water fees on trees (Ecosystem Marketplace)

The Colorado utility Denver Water delivers clean drinking water to 1.3 million people spread across more than 335 square miles, and most of that water comes from rivers and reservoirs that capture run-off from forest-covered hills in clearly-delineated watersheds.


December 22, 2014--Making water conservation pay (Eco Business)

Call it a sign of the times. Rarely a month passes in which a water crisis does not make headlines somewhere in the world. In early August, an algal bloom in Lake Erie, the result of agricultural runoff, contaminated drinking water in Toledo, Ohio.


December 18, 2014--MillerCoors, Pepsi, Wells Fargo donate $1M to Colorado forests (Denver Business Journal)

The money will help pay for the nonprofit to spend three years designing, implementing, and measuring the progress of forest restoration projects intended to "improve water security" for the Denver metro area and also reduce the threat of catastrophic wildfires.


September 19, 2014--How the hot and dry West is killing Rocky Mountain forests (High Country News)

Severe fires, unprecedented bark beetle infestations, heat and drought – all exacerbated by climate change – are killing trees throughout the Rocky Mountains. So whether you’re a fan of New Mexico’s piñon pines, Colorado’s aspens or Montana’s whitebark pines, the West’s forests could look radically different in 50 to 100 years.


September 5, 2014--Forests dying as Rocky Mountains heat up (Beacon)

Nobody paid much attention at first when pine beetles started multiplying in the montane forests of Colorado in the late 1990s. Old-timers had seen it all before; a few years of beetle kill, then a long, hard early winter freeze that killed most of the bugs during their winter larval phase, suppressing numbers back down to an endemic background level.


February 23, 2014--Dartmouth study suggests clearcutting and ‘snow farming’ as global warming mitigation (Summit Voice)

Snow farming is nothing new for ski area operators, who have long been cultivating the white stuff to help keep their slopes covered. Now, a recent study by researchers at Darthmouth College suggests that snow farming could also make sense on a larger scale, in the context of climate-change mitigation.


November 19, 2013--Drier climate invites invasive beetle (Cortez Journal)

A migrating bug is finding the pine trees and drier climate in Southwest Colorado more appetizing, a cause of concern for public land officials. The round mountain pine beetle has landed on a forested mesa above the Lower Dolores River Canyon, and is killing ponderosa pines, reports Derek Padilla district ranger for the San Juan National Forest.


October 14, 2013--New guidance to protect America's water and reduce costs with natural infrastructure (Water Online)

A group of water experts has released new guidance for U.S. resource managers to expand the availability of clean water through the conservation and restoration of forests and other natural infrastructure.


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