Agriculture

July 19, 2014--Water rationing for farmers? It's on the horizon (Arizona Central)

Regional water planners last month made a prediction that will likely be a game-changer for Arizona's economy, revealing just how water scarcity will restructure the future of our food security. As early as 2017, drought in the Lower Colorado River's watershed could lead to irrigation rationing for central Arizona agriculture.


July 18, 2014--Drought is catalyst to reforming how we deliver water to Americans (Denver Business Journal)

For many people, news coverage of drought, low water tables, and increased pumping of aquifers are just words. The average American lacks full understanding of how the drought in the Western states affects them and the businesses they patronize.


July 18, 2014--New report recommends effective water solutions in CO River Basin (Water World)

American Rivers and Western Resource Advocates -- two authorities on Western water issues -- issued a new report that identifies conservation, reuse and other innovative solutions that could eliminate Western water shortages stemming from the over-stressed Colorado River.


July 16, 2014--California agriculture industry facing $1 billion in drought losses (Los Angeles Times)

California’s agricultural industry is facing $1 billion in lost revenue this year from the state’s worst drought in decades and could pay about $500 million for additional groundwater pumping, a new study said.


July 16, 2014--Grasshopper plagues: agricultural nightmare or ecological boon? (High Country News)

In early June, meteorologists at the National Weather Service in Albuquerque, New Mexico, were puzzled: There was a big splotch on the radar that didn’t look like any weather system they’d ever seen. Maybe their software had a bug? Turns out, the dark green blob hovering over Albuquerque wasn’t a software glitch at all but a giant swarm of grasshoppers.


July 16, 2014--One farmers group actually likes proposed EPA water rules (Fence Post)

The Rocky Mountain Farmers Union has broken ranks with many other water users in Colorado to support proposed rules meant to clear up discrepancies in U.S. Supreme Court rulings on the Clean Water Act. The group claims false claims are being made about the rules. The rules are proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers.


July 15, 2014--California drought threatens to dry up farm wells (Washington Post)

Researchers say farmers in pockets of California hardest hit by the drought could begin to see wells run dry next year. The Center for Watershed Sciences at the University of California, Davis, released the study Tuesday on the possible impact if the next two years remain dry in California.


July 10, 2014--Western Slope counties look to protect water resources (Summit Daily)

“No more water across the Divide” is the rallying cry of the Colorado Basin Implementation Plan. The second draft of the plan was released July 1, and over and over it calls for a stop to diversions of water from the Colorado River Basin under the Continental Divide.


July 6, 2014--Water transfers: Wrong and wasteful? (Appeal Democrat)

Year after year, Sacramento Valley groundwater is pumped out to replace surface water being sent south. It's been called an amoral practice and an unnecessary strain on a resource that is being depleted. It's said the impacts are being swept under the rug so big business agriculture in the south can stay afloat during the drought.


Senate Bill 23

On June 5th, Governor Hickenlooper vetoed Senate Bill 23, an agricultural water conservation bill crafted over the course of a year in close partnership with many water interests, including the Governor’s own water policy experts. The bill was designed to incentivize the implementation of irrigation efficiency improvements that would ultimately benefit agricultural operations and Colorado’s rivers and streams. Interestingly, the bill would have only affected West Slope irrigators. Under the bill’s provisions, ranchers, farmers and other agricultural water users could voluntarily implement irrigation and water efficiency measures and ensure that water they save would benefit Colorado’s rivers without risking abandonment of their water rights or harming other users. The result would have been increased private investment in upgrades to and modernization of irrigation infrastructure, healthier rivers and streams, and more resilient farms and ranches. SB 23 had support from many rural Coloradans, major water providers, Colorado’s leading conservation organizations, and Colorado Water Congress, the state’s leading voice for water policy.


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