Agriculture

July 28, 2014--Water table depth can affect crops (AGWeek)

Shallow water tables can impact crop production, according to Daniel Ostrem, South Dakota State University Extension water resource field specialist. “The water level underground can greatly benefit the crop or hinder its growth, depending on where it is located in respect to the plant’s roots,” Ostrem says.


July 26, 2014--Aquifer's decline threatens economy (Salina Journal)

As a boy in the late 1940s, Gary Baker occasionally rolled out of bed at 3 a.m. to help his father harness a head of water meandering down the Great Eastern Ditch. The supply was diverted from the Arkansas River and collected in Lake McKinney, then released to feed a ditch system capable of flood-irrigating crops.


July 25, 2014--The Colorado River Basin can’t afford to leave farmers out to dry (Environmental Defense Fund)

On Colorado River Day, it’s worth considering how we can write the next chapter in the water story of the American West. With the recent news that Lake Mead is at its lowest level in history, it’s impossible to ignore the trajectory of America’s hardest-working river.


July 24, 2014--Colorado farmers break ranks with ‘big ag’ lobby (Durango Herald)

Groups like the American Farm Bureau Federation and other “big ag” organizations are protesting proposed federal rules that would redefine which bodies of water are regulated under the Clean Water Act. Among the exceptions to that protest are farmers represented by the Denver-based Rocky Mountain Farmers Union.


July 22, 2014--Drier than the Dust Bowl: Waiting for relief in rural America (Washington Post)

As rural America wilts, this is how those left working its powder-dry land get by: At the appointed hour, Chuck turns the head gate at the Fort Lyon Canal, sending water sluicing through ditches bordering the fields. He tracks up and down the rows, adjusting pipes and valves to make sure the water is flowing just right.


July 19, 2014--Drought pushing water prices to record levels (Times Herald)

Rumors drifted across the parched Central Valley that a bidding war for water might push auction prices as high as $3,000 an acre-foot, up from $60 in a normal year. Yet, Ray Flanders needed water to keep his orchards alive.


July 19, 2014--Water rationing for farmers? It's on the horizon (Arizona Central)

Regional water planners last month made a prediction that will likely be a game-changer for Arizona's economy, revealing just how water scarcity will restructure the future of our food security. As early as 2017, drought in the Lower Colorado River's watershed could lead to irrigation rationing for central Arizona agriculture.


July 18, 2014--Drought is catalyst to reforming how we deliver water to Americans (Denver Business Journal)

For many people, news coverage of drought, low water tables, and increased pumping of aquifers are just words. The average American lacks full understanding of how the drought in the Western states affects them and the businesses they patronize.


July 18, 2014--New report recommends effective water solutions in CO River Basin (Water World)

American Rivers and Western Resource Advocates -- two authorities on Western water issues -- issued a new report that identifies conservation, reuse and other innovative solutions that could eliminate Western water shortages stemming from the over-stressed Colorado River.


July 16, 2014--California agriculture industry facing $1 billion in drought losses (Los Angeles Times)

California’s agricultural industry is facing $1 billion in lost revenue this year from the state’s worst drought in decades and could pay about $500 million for additional groundwater pumping, a new study said.


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