Agriculture

July 15, 2014--California drought threatens to dry up farm wells (Washington Post)

Researchers say farmers in pockets of California hardest hit by the drought could begin to see wells run dry next year. The Center for Watershed Sciences at the University of California, Davis, released the study Tuesday on the possible impact if the next two years remain dry in California.


July 10, 2014--Western Slope counties look to protect water resources (Summit Daily)

“No more water across the Divide” is the rallying cry of the Colorado Basin Implementation Plan. The second draft of the plan was released July 1, and over and over it calls for a stop to diversions of water from the Colorado River Basin under the Continental Divide.


July 6, 2014--Water transfers: Wrong and wasteful? (Appeal Democrat)

Year after year, Sacramento Valley groundwater is pumped out to replace surface water being sent south. It's been called an amoral practice and an unnecessary strain on a resource that is being depleted. It's said the impacts are being swept under the rug so big business agriculture in the south can stay afloat during the drought.


Senate Bill 23

On June 5th, Governor Hickenlooper vetoed Senate Bill 23, an agricultural water conservation bill crafted over the course of a year in close partnership with many water interests, including the Governor’s own water policy experts. The bill was designed to incentivize the implementation of irrigation efficiency improvements that would ultimately benefit agricultural operations and Colorado’s rivers and streams. Interestingly, the bill would have only affected West Slope irrigators. Under the bill’s provisions, ranchers, farmers and other agricultural water users could voluntarily implement irrigation and water efficiency measures and ensure that water they save would benefit Colorado’s rivers without risking abandonment of their water rights or harming other users. The result would have been increased private investment in upgrades to and modernization of irrigation infrastructure, healthier rivers and streams, and more resilient farms and ranches. SB 23 had support from many rural Coloradans, major water providers, Colorado’s leading conservation organizations, and Colorado Water Congress, the state’s leading voice for water policy.


June 27, 2014--California may only have two years of water, other states not far behind (Water Online)

Each drought-afflicted state is unhappy in its own way. Just ask federal meteorologist Brad Rippey, who outlined the difficulties of U.S. water scarcity in a recent interview published by 24/7 Wall St.


June 26, 2014--‘Risky business’ report says two things about water—one is obvious, the other is not (Circle of Blue)

Three rich and powerful men — former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg, former U.S. treasury secretary Henry Paulson, and hedge fund manager Tom Steyer — want business leaders and investors to understand global warming in financial terms: as a significant economic risk.


June 26, 2014--Helping America's farmers rise to the challenge of climate change (Post Independent)

Farmers, ranchers and foresters have long understood the need to care for our land and water — not only because preserving those resources for our children and their children is the right thing to do, but because they know that our farms and forests are more productive and efficient when they’re properly cared for.


June 23, 2014--849,610 pounds of toxic chemicals released into Colorado waterways (Denver Post)

Industrial polluters released 849,610 pounds of toxic chemicals into Colorado waterways in 2012, according to a report drawn from federal data. The most prevalent chemical — nitrates — causes algae growth that leads to dead zones in rivers and streams.


June 23, 2014--California’s thirst is moving mountains (Postmedia)

California may be in the midst of a severe drought, but plump, juicy strawberries and raspberries continue to roll north by the truckload. And they are still affordable despite predictions of price shocks for Canadian consumers who gobble up California fruits, veggies and nuts worth close to $2.4 billion a year.


June 23, 2014--Insecticides put world food supplies at risk, say scientists (Guardian)

The world’s most widely used insecticides have contaminated the environment across the planet so pervasively that global food production is at risk, according to a comprehensive scientific assessment of the chemicals’ impacts.


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