July 5, 2016--Why a half-degree temperature rise is a big deal (NASA)

The Paris Agreement, which delegates from 196 countries hammered out in December 2015, calls for holding the ongoing rise in global average temperature to “well below 2 °C above pre-industrial levels,” while “pursuing efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1.5 °C.” How much difference could that half-degree of wiggle room (or 0.9 degree on the Fahrenheit sc

July 4, 2016--Agriculture community also affected by oil and gas slowdown (Greeley Tribune)

When the South Platte River flows high, Chuck Sylvester doesn’t get nervous. He grew up on the river. His family’s farm has been in LaSalle for 150 years. High water, low water — he’s seen it all more times than he can count. But he’s only seen the water rise higher than the doorknob of his garage once.

July 3, 2016--Vail Daily column: Use it or lose it? (Vail Daily)

The “use it or lose it” feature of Colorado water law is often blamed for discouraging farmers and ranchers from taking efficiency and conservation measures that could benefit the environment or ease the supply and demand imbalance on the Colorado River.

June 30, 2016--Agricultural reuse projects offer a glimpse into the future of water (Water Online)

While consumers are still coming around to the idea of drinking recycled water, there have been far fewer ideological obstacles standing in the way of water reuse for non-potable purposes.

June 26, 2016--After years of drought and overuse, the San Luis Valley aquifer refills (High Country News)

The San Luis Valley in southern Colorado is an 8,000-square-mile expanse of farmland speckled with potato, alfalfa, barley and quinoa fields between the San Juan and Sangre de Cristo mountain ranges. Only about 7 inches of rain fall each year in the San Luis Valley. But while farmers and ranchers can’t depend on moisture above ground, they make up the difference beneath it.

June 3, 2016--Colorado water law doesn't discourage efficiency (Post Independent)

The “use it or lose it” feature of Colorado water law is often blamed for discouraging farmers and ranchers from taking efficiency and conservation measures that could benefit the environment or ease the supply/demand imbalance on the Colorado River.

May 14, 2016--Chances drying up for rafting the Dolores River (Cortez Journal)

Though early indications had some river enthusiasts hopeful the lower Dolores River would have enough water for rafting for the first time since 2011, all signs now point to another year of a lonely river. “We’re real close to the ‘It ain’t going to happen’ stage right now,” said Mike Preston, general manager of the Dolores Water Conservancy Distr

May 10, 2016--Groundwater a huge factor in sustaining Colorado River flows (Summit Voice)

Resource managers grappling with the vexing question of how to allocate Colorado River water to the thirsty cities, ranches and farms of the Southwest have some new food for thought. A new U.S.

May 8, 2016--Dolores water district unveils $8 million in upgrades (Cortez Journal)

There’s a reason farmers with the Dolores Project get on-demand, pressurized irrigation water delivered to the edge of their fields. Five automated, high-tech pumping stations do the heavy lifting of pulling water from canals and pushing it through pipes to farms.

Water-Energy Nexus

The interdependencies between water and energy, the water-energy nexus, is becoming more prominent. Water is used in all phases of energy production and energy is required to extract, convey, and deliver water. Yet, several trends are adding stress to the water-energy nexus, namely climate change and population growth. According to the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Water-Energy Nexus: Challenges and Opportunities report, power generation and agriculture-related are the largest users of water in the U.S. However, water withdrawals have been steadily decreasing due to a number of factors, predominantly reduced supplies, while growth in the two fore-mentioned sectors have been steadily increasing.

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