September 19, 2015--Lawmaker wary of fracking wastewater on crops (Water Online)

A California legislator wants foods made with crops that rely on recycled fracking wastewater to be labelled as such. “Assemblyman Mike Gatto, D-Glendale, said such water might include harmful contaminants, including carcinogens,” Capital Public Radio reported. “Oil companies sell Central Valley farms millions of gallons of treated wastewater every day for irrigation.

August 2, 2015--Hydro-powered irrigation: Colorado makes water work (Earth Techling)

Much of the west coast’s water comes from the Colorado river, which, as its name suggests, originates high in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. The current drought is most severe at the end of the line in Nevada and California, but Colorado is also drying out. Restrictions on residential water use are helping, but can only do so much.

July 10, 2015--It's about to get easier for California farmers to conserve water—and sell it (CityLab)

There’s no “solving” California’s drought, as so many headlines suggest. Drought is a regular feature of the Western climate cycle.

July 1, 2015--Federal farming incentives contribute to the "killing" of the Colorado River (Aspen Public Radio)

Incentives from the federal government for farmers who grow crops like cotton are contributing to the depletion of the Colorado River. A Propublica report this spring investigated the issue. The article’s author was at the Aspen Ideas Festival Tuesday (6/30).

June 30, 2015--Here's how U.S. groundwater travels the globe via food (Smithsonian)

Freshwater in the United States is really on the move. Much of the water pulled from underground reservoirs called aquifers gets incorporated into crops and other foodstuffs, which are then are shuttled around the country or transferred as far away as Israel and Japan, according to a new study.

New Water Rights Transfer

The non-profit Colorado Water Trust and the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) have unveiled a creative new way for agricultural water rights holders to be compensated for sharing their water to meet conservation goals. The two organizations have collaborated to restore late summer flows to a 5-mile stretch of the Little Cimarron River in the Gunnison River Basin by sharing an agricultural water right.

June 25, 2015--How a historical blunder helped create the water crisis in the West (NPR)

In 1922, seven Western states — Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming and California — drew up an agreement on how to divide the waters of the Colorado River. But there was one big problem with the plan: They overestimated how much water the river could provide. As a result, each state was promised more water than actually exists.

June 17, 2015--The Colorado River is not a water buffet. So why the 'first come, first serve' policy? (Guardian)

As water shortages grip California and the seven state Colorado River basin, many users feel no pain, while some face a complete curtailment. That’s because the water management system is not designed to be either efficient or equitable but consistent and predictable.

June 15, 2015--Study shows vast potential for cutting water use on farms (Deseret News)

Already 1 million acre-feet of water once used on farms, ranches and orchards throughout the seven states in the Colorado River basin is being "saved," mainly through water system improvements and reductions in consumption. A probe of water use by the agricultural sector is included in the "Moving Forward" phase of the Colorado River Basin Supply and Demand St

June 10, 2015--May rains boost water outlook (Mancos Times)

The rains of May have continued into June and drastically improved irrigation supply in McPhee Reservoir. Low winter snowpack had led forecasters to believe that the reservoir would not fill enough for a full irrigation supply. In early May, farmers were told they would receive just 10 inches per acre, less than half their full allocation of 22 inches. But record rain and snow in

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