Water Use Audits Offered to Farmers!

Farmers consume nearly 90 percent of Colorado's water, and Colorado State University is offering ways for them to use it more efficiently. A grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to CSU's Center for Agricultural Energy will pay for reduced-cost irrigation efficiency audits for growers with center pivot systems.

November 20, 2015--Colorado Water Plan's impact on Western Slope (Western Slope Now)

State leaders celebrated the completion of Colorado's first ever water plan, a comprehensive approach to solving the state's future water supply gap. State projections indicated by the year 2050, Colorado would have a supply gap of about 560,000 acre-feet of water.  That is equivalent to about 180 billion gallons of water per year. Hannah Holm, the coordinator of the Hutc

November 19, 2015--Colorado's Water Plan will need everyone to pitch in, officials say (Denver Post)

Colorado adopted a landmark $20 billion water plan Thursday to try to accommodate rapid population growth by conserving more, re-using more, storing more, sharing more between farmers and cities — and diverting less west-east across mountains. "Now is the time to re-think how we can be more efficient," Gov.

Agriculture/Irrigation Information

With more than 90 percent of water used for agriculture/irrigation in the San Juan/Dolores River Basin, the following provides useful information and resources kindly supplied, in part, with permission from the Southeastern Colorado Water Conservation District:

November 5, 2015--Water rule hits choppy water (Durango Herald)

The U.S. Senate this week advanced one effort to eliminate a controversial new rule extending regulation over small bodies of water, while blocking another attempt to rewrite it. “Coloradans know when they’re getting soaked,” Colorado Sen. Cory Gardner, a Republican, said following votes on Tuesday.

October 14, 2015--US Senator Bennet calls for passage of SB 384 — The ditch irrigation bill (Greeley Tribune)

Bennet visited a farm west of Eaton early Monday afternoon to learn about ditch irrigation, hoping to take what he learned back to Washington to help pass Senate Bill 384, known as the ditch irrigation bill, an effort to amend the tax code to facilitate water leasing and water transfers to promote conservancy and efficiency.

October 9, 2015--Business leaders pitch water sharing between urban, rural communities (Durango Herald)

Business leaders Thursday said they hope to replace the practice of “buy-and-dry” with “buy-and-grow,” a plan that would allow farmers to share their water rights with municipalities. The idea was proposed at a meeting in Denver with state and local water officials, hosted by the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce. Kelly Brough, chief executive of the chamber, sa

September 29, 2015--Water users seek ways to avoid forced cutbacks (Pine River Times)

The nightmare scenario for West Slope water nerds is a "call" on the Colorado River, meaning that Colorado, Wyoming, and Northwest New Mexico are not delivering a legally required amount of water to California, Nevada, Arizona, and Utah. If or when that happens, some water users in the three Upper Basin states will have their water use curtailed so that the Lower Basin sta

September 22, 2015--UN report shows staggering cost of land degradation (Summit Voice)

Unsustainable land-use practices are a $6.3 trillion drain on the global economy, according to a new report from the United Nations University, which assesses the value of ecosystem services provided by land resources such as food, poverty reduction, clean water, climate and disease regulation and nutrients cycling. That figure is equal to about 15 percent of global GDP, the researcher sai

September 21, 2015--State agrees to improve flows on Lower Dolores (Durango Herald)

Colorado’s top water board agreed Tuesday to improve flows on the Lower Dolores River to boost the health of the river and its native fish. The Colorado Water Conservation Board will seek an in-stream flow right of up to 900 cubic feet per second on the Lower Dolores below its confluence with the San Miguel River. In-stream flows are designated by the board to preserve an

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