Agriculture

Water Use Audits Offered to Farmers!

Farmers consume nearly 90 percent of Colorado's water, and Colorado State University is offering ways for them to use it more efficiently. A grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to CSU's Center for Agricultural Energy will pay for reduced-cost irrigation efficiency audits for growers with center pivot systems.


April 17, 2014--Ag life a trying endeavor (Durango Herald)

Agriculture is a difficult profession in the best of times, but it’s an even bigger challenge during a drought. That’s one of the many takeaways from Wednesday evening’s panel discussing current and future issues for local agriculture sponsored by the League of Women Voters of La Plata County.

April 16, 2014--Jolted by reality, Colorado River water managers plan for persistent drought (Circle of Blue)

The severe risks of an extended drought in the Colorado River Basin – a shutdown of hydropower generation, functionally empty lakes, and restrictions on water use – are forcing the basin’s seven states to consider unprecedented changes in how they manage a scarce resource.


April 16, 2014--Drought regions show high levels of “water stress” (US News and World Report)

California’s drought has become the state’s worst on record, draining reservoirs and destroying crops. Yet it’s far from unique. Severely dry conditions are now afflicting about two-thirds of Texas, and droughts also are being felt in parts of Oklahoma, Minnesota and Colorado.

April 11, 2014--EPA administrator says water rule is intended to provide clarity for farmers (Feedstuffs)

According to FeedstuffsEnvironmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy says the newly proposed waters of the U.S. rule is meant to provide clarity and certainty for farmers to do what they do, which is farm.


April 11, 2014--Water supply concerns dominate regional seminar (Pine River Times)

With continuing population growth in Southwestern states and ongoing drought, water issues are becoming more and more about who has to cut back their use when there isn't enough to meet demand. That thread ran through presentations at the annual Water Seminar on April 4 in Durango, sponsored by the Southwest Water Conservation District.


April 10, 2014--Determining the sustainability of water, agriculture in Arizona (ASU News)

Central Arizona has a rich history of agriculture, contributing $9.2 billion toward the state’s economy. That water has near-absolute power in determining the region’s fate is not an over-reaching assumption. With increasing urban development and an uncertain climate, is this industry doomed or can it be sustained?


April 6, 2014--San Joaquin Valley sinking as groundwater stores are depleted (Sacramento Bee)

Flat as a tabletop, the furrowed, brown farm fields east of this San Joaquin Valley town are some of the most productive on Earth. Every spring, they are planted with a smorgasbord of crops that in one form or another are trucked to grocery stores across America, from fresh juicy tomatoes to freeze-dried onion flakes, honeydew melons to tortilla chips.


April 3, 2014--Water shortages for New Mexico farmers, fish (Albuquerque Journal)

Much of the snowpack in northern New Mexico and southern Colorado is already gone, but it seems to be blowing away in the wind rather than melting into the state’s streams and rivers. That has water managers scrambling to cope with the state’s fourth consecutive very dry year.


March 30, 2014--Meeting climate targets may require reducing meat and dairy consumption (Science Codex)

Greenhouse gas emissions from food production may threaten the UN climate target of limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius, according to research at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. On Monday 31 March the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) presents their report on the impacts of climate change.


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