Agriculture

Water Use Audits Offered to Farmers!

Farmers consume nearly 90 percent of Colorado's water, and Colorado State University is offering ways for them to use it more efficiently. A grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to CSU's Center for Agricultural Energy will pay for reduced-cost irrigation efficiency audits for growers with center pivot systems.


October 22, 2014--Reducing water scarcity (McGill University)

Water scarcity is not a problem just for the developing world. In California, legislators are currently proposing a $7.5 billion emergency water plan to their voters; and U.S. federal officials last year warned residents of Arizona and Nevada that they could face cuts in Colorado River water deliveries in 2016.


October 15, 2014--The Columbia, a gem of a notion (Californian)

We can no longer waste our precious fresh water. Instead of just dumping the Columbia River into the Pacific Ocean at Astoria, Ore., we should recycle it. In less than six months, America could install a 25-foot diameter poly pipe upon the continental shelf, annually transporting 25 million acre feet of clean fresh water to California.


October 15, 2014--The West is bone dry. Here’s how to help (Washington Post)

Drought is rampant these days in many parts of the American West, so consider this a pretty sweet gift: You’ve just been given the rights to some water. An acre-foot of it, to be exact, which is roughly enough to fill an NBA basketball court so the water laps at the bottom of the backboard. Your job is to turn around and use that resource in the most valuable way possible.


October 11, 2014--Western Colorado’s water safe for now (Post Independent)

Perry Cabot, a Grand Junction resident, is a doctor of agricultural engineering and land resources. While currently employed by Colorado State University’s extension office in Grand Junction, he’s working hard to gain insight into one of Colorado’s biggest issues — water and its impacts on agriculture.


October 8, 2014--Ag water conservation (Gazette Xtra)

Throughout the nation, growers, farmers and ranchers are contending with water scarcity caused by rising global temperatures, climate variability, droughts, floods, pollution, growing populations and increased demands. However, as those in agriculture always do, they adapt to stay viable.


October 5, 2014--Water officials battle overpumping irrigators (Topeka Capital Journal)

Kansas state records show that fewer irrigators are pumping more than they are allowed but that the issue remains a problem as the Ogallala Aquifer shrinks. Last year, state officials hardened the fines, hoping to curb overpumping, The Hutchinson News reported.


October 3, 2014--Dam gets dedicated (Durango Herald)

The traditional ribbon cutting Thursday officially brought on line the Long Hollow Reservoir, raising the hopes of irrigators for a more consistent supply of water. Already the reservoir, capacity 5,300 acre-feet, has seen a little accumulation of water from recent heavy rain funneled into it via Long Hollow Creek and Government Draw.


September 27, 2014--3 ways to save Arizona's water supply (Arizona Central)

We are benefiting now from past strong water planning and leadership. Today we need more creative thinking and action to avoid water shortages that will come. Demand for water in the seven-state Colorado River basin now exceeds supply. Much of the water actually leaves the Colorado basin to places like Denver, Los Angeles, San Diego and Salt Lake City. The drought only makes it worse.


September 27, 2014--When the Wells Run Dry: Helping farmers grow more with less (Climate Confidential)

Water scarcity is closely linked to food insecurity and thus hunger and poverty. Today, some 2.8 billion people face water scarcity, a number that’s set to increase to half the world’s population by 2030, according to the United Nations.


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