Pacific Institute

October 14, 2016--New study suggests water conservation remains the cheapest alternative (Ink Stain)

A new study published last week by Heather Cooley and colleagues at the Pacific Institute concludes that water conservation remains the cheapest water supply alternative as compared to the big new sources widely discussed, things like storm water capture, desalination, and recycling/reuse.


April 8, 2015--Water wars in California: Factory farms draining the state dry (Huff Post)

California Governor Jerry Brown has been talking tough about California's growing drought crisis. In January he declared a state of emergency saying, "I'm calling on all Californians to conserve water in every way possible," and just last week he announced that we are "in a new era" of drought severity.


History of Water Conflicts

The Pacific Institute has created a 5,000-year timeline (http://www2.worldwater.org/conflict/index.html) of water conflicts that shows that water politics have been messy since the beginning. The timeline goes as far back as 3,000 BC and includes such examples as poisoning enemy wells, targeting and destroying hydroelectric dams, bombing of irrigation canals, and riots sparked by insufficient water supplies. The Pacific Institute indicated that “the problems are expected to continue.” By 2025, scientists predict that one in five humans will live in regions suffering from water scarcity and many analysts have predicted that pressure on water resources could spark wars in the coming years. Moreover, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the world has not woken up to the water crisis caused by climate change. The latest report from the United Nations IPCC predicted a rise in global temperature of between .5 to 8.6 Fahrenheit by the late 21st century. More extreme weather such as droughts will lead to serious water shortages and affect agricultural output and food security. Development experts around the world have become increasingly concerned about water security in recent years. More frequent floods and droughts caused by climate change, pollution of rivers and lakes, urbanization, over-extraction of ground water, and expanding populations mean that many nations will face serious water shortages.


March 22, 2015--Will California's drought affect hydroelectric power? (Christian Science Monitor)

For California, now in its fourth year of drought, the record low snowfall, in addition to the lack of rain, is beginning to hamper the state’s supply of hydroelectric energy. This winter California received only 12 percent of its average snowpack, meaning that there will be dramatically less runoff into the rivers and dams across the Sierra Nevada this spring. “We&#3


January 17, 2015--A brief history of water conflict (Water Online)

As nations face problems ranging from pollution to scarcity, the politics of water resources have become complicated—but that is nothing new. The Pacific Institute, a think tank, has created a 5,000-year timeline of water conflicts, including religious accounts. It shows that water politics have been messy since the beginning.


December 10, 2014--What to do when climate change poses a risk to your water supply (Guardian)

As evidence of climate change mounts, businesses across all sectors of the economy are developing strategies for identifying and avoiding the risks it poses.


September 27, 2014--When the Wells Run Dry: Helping farmers grow more with less (Climate Confidential)

Water scarcity is closely linked to food insecurity and thus hunger and poverty. Today, some 2.8 billion people face water scarcity, a number that’s set to increase to half the world’s population by 2030, according to the United Nations.


July 13, 2014--Another view: Busting water conservation myths (Sacramento Bee)

As a solution for California’s complex water challenges, conserving water to get more from every drop stands out for its great potential and the misconceptions around it.


California Could Save Up to 14 Million Acre-Feet of Water

According to a new analysis released by the Pacific Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council, California could be saving up to 14 million acre-feet of untapped water--providing more than the amount of water used in all of California’s cities in one year--with an aggressive statewide effort to use water-saving practices, reuse water, and capture lost stormwater. “Our current approach to water use is unsustainable, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t enough water to meet our needs,” said Kate Poole, NRDC senior attorney with the water program. “At a time when every drop counts, we need to employ sensible and cost-effective 21st century solutions that will help us reduce uses today while promising new, resilient supplies for cities and farms tomorrow.” “As climate change brings more extreme weather, including droughts, ramping up forward-thinking solutions now will help us be more resilient,” said Peter Gleick (pictured right), president of the Pacific Institute.


June 20, 2014--Water war bubbling up between California and Arizona (Los Angeles Times)

Once upon a time, California and Arizona went to war over water. The year was 1934, and Arizona was convinced that the construction of Parker Dam on the lower Colorado River was merely a plot to enable California to steal its water rights.


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