Water Shortages

September 12, 2016--When do we stop calling what’s happening on the Colorado River “shortage”? (Ink Stain)

Putting together a lecture for University of New Mexico Water Resources Program students tomorrow, I’ve been thinking about this quote from MWD’s Bill Hasencamp, in last week’s LA Times:


August 19, 2016--Rio water pollution reflects global crisis (Guardian)

The heavily contaminated waters of Rio don’t only put at risk the health of Olympians (Report, 3 August), they adversely affect the millions of people facing this faecal nightmare day in and day out. Despite Brazil being an upper-middle income country,


June 10, 2016--Collaborating to protect Lake Mead (Arizona Capitol Times)

The Central Arizona Project (CAP) and the Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR) recently hosted a second Colorado River Shortage Update. CAP and ADWR presented the latest information about the near-term outlook for the river and how Arizona can keep the river out of shortage in 2017.


March 11, 2016--Despite state water plan, local headwaters have growing claims (Summit Daily)

The battle over water is moving to a boil. Colorado unveiled a statewide water plan this past November to better prepare for an estimated doubling of its population by the year 2050, from about 5 million to an estimated 10.5 million.


February 5, 2016--The right to waste water: In the west, water users forced to use it or lose it (Pro Publica)

High in the Rocky Mountains, snowmelt fills a stream that trickles down into Ohio Creek and then onward toward the Upper Gunnison River.


February 1, 2016--More federal resources needed to fight drought in the West (Las Vegas Sun)

The annual Colorado College Conservation in the West Poll results released in January, surveying attitudes of voters in seven Western states on conservation, environment and energy issues, shows just how much Westerners, most particularly Western Hispanics, are concerned about the ongoing drought. A significant majority of Hispanics polled considered water issues — low levels of wate


January 25, 2016--Report: Warming could impact water supplies in western states (Public News Service--WY)

Surface temperatures across the globe in 2015 were the warmest since modern recordkeeping began in 1880, according to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. And 15 of the 16 warmest years on record have occurred since the new century began. Noah Diffenbaugh is an associate professor at Stanford University and senior author of a&


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