Dead Zones

November 10, 2014--Study: Global warming worsening watery dead zones (Washington Post)

Global warming is likely playing a bigger role than previously thought in dead zones in oceans, lakes and rivers around the world and it’s only going to get worse, according to a new study. Dead zones occur when fertilizer runoff clogs waterways with nutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorous.


September 25, 2014--World stands by as algae and dead zones ruin water (Circle of Blue)

Decades of research and billions of dollars spent to understand the causes of toxic algae blooms and oxygen-starved aquatic dead zones around the world have produced more scientific knowledge but achieved few results to solve two of the most dangerous threats to the world’s oceans and fresh water reserves.


June 23, 2014--849,610 pounds of toxic chemicals released into Colorado waterways (Denver Post)

Industrial polluters released 849,610 pounds of toxic chemicals into Colorado waterways in 2012, according to a report drawn from federal data. The most prevalent chemical — nitrates — causes algae growth that leads to dead zones in rivers and streams.


October 17, 2012--Refreshing the Clean Water Act (Los Angeles Times)

On Thursday, one of the country's most effective environmental laws — the federal Clean Water Act — will turn 40.


February 3, 2011--Helping feed the world without polluting its waters (Science Daily)

A growing global population has lead to increasing demands for food. Farmers around the world rely, at least in part on phosphorus-based fertilizers in order to sustain and improve crop yields. But the overuse of phosphorus can lead to freshwater pollution and the development of a host of problems, such as the spread of blue-green algae in lakes and the growth of coastal 'dead zones'.


September 27, 2010--Elevated Nitrogen and Phosphorus Still Widespread in U.S. Streams and Groundwater (Science Daily)

Elevated concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus, nutrients that can negatively impact aquatic ecosystems and human health, have remained the same or increased in many streams and aquifers across the United States since the early 1990's, according to a new national study by the U.S. Geological Survey.


Manure Pollution

Animal manure, a byproduct as old as agriculture, has become an unlikely modern pollution problem, scientists and environmentalists say. The country simply has more dung than it can handle: Crowded together at a new breed of megafarms, livestock produce three times as much waste as people, more than can be recycled as fertilizer for nearby fields.


March 1, 2010--Manure becomes pollutant as its volume grows unmanageable (Washington Post)

Animal manure, a byproduct as old as agriculture, has become an unlikely modern pollution problem, scientists and environmentalists say.


February 17, 2009--Aquatic 'dead zones' persistent, scientists say (L.A. Times)

Healing low-oxygen aquatic dead zones in the Chesapeake Bay and hundreds of other spots worldwide will be trickier than previously imagined, according to leading scientists on the issue.

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