Aquifers

October 15, 2014--Time for a serious policy on water pricing (Bloomberg Businessweek)

Do you know the price of your monthly cell phone bill? I bet you do. How about your water bill? What’s the cost difference between taking a shower for 5 minutes or 30 minutes? Most Americans consume plenty of clean water without worrying much, if at all, about its price. Yet which is more valuable, water or a smartphone?


August 18, 2014--The cup's half full without groundwater regulation (Los Angeles Times)

They're all patting themselves on the back in the state Capitol for finally achieving a water bond deal. And that's fine. It was a momentous act. But what really would be historic — and worth running self-congratulatory reelection ads about — would be to pair the bond proposal with even more important groundwater regulation.

August 17, 2014--West’s historic drought stokes fears of water crisis (Washington Post)

When the winter rains failed to arrive in this Sacramento Valley town for the third straight year, farmers tightened their belts and looked to the reservoirs in the nearby hills to keep them in water through the growing season.


August 9, 2014--In dry California, water goes to those who drill the deepest (Al Jazeera America)

The only sign of life sprouting out of a vast expanse of land in this unincorporated corner of Tulare County is a large drilling rig and two trucks laden with 1,000-foot-long drill pipes. Men in hard hats work round the clock in sweltering 100-plus degree temperatures and in the still of the night, under the glare of construction night lights.


July 29, 2014--Groundwater pumping causes ground to drop (Press-Enterprise)

Creating a lush, artificial oasis in the Coachella Valley has siphoned away so much underground water that the land above it is sinking. Land surfaces declined nine inches to two feet in some areas of Palm Desert, Indian Wells, and La Quinta between 1995 and 2010 because so much groundwater was being pumped from the aquifers beneath, according to a 17-year study done by the U.S.


July 26, 2014--Aquifer's decline threatens economy (Salina Journal)

As a boy in the late 1940s, Gary Baker occasionally rolled out of bed at 3 a.m. to help his father harness a head of water meandering down the Great Eastern Ditch. The supply was diverted from the Arkansas River and collected in Lake McKinney, then released to feed a ditch system capable of flood-irrigating crops.


July 25, 2014--Oil and gas companies look to deep aquifers for water (KUNC)

Applications to the state to use deep aquifer water for hydraulic fracturing are surging in Colorado. Before 2011 there were no applications for oil and gas use. Since 2011 though, property owners have applied to use 35,600 acre-feet of aquifer water for oil and gas development, according to the Colorado Division of Water Resources.


July 24, 2014--In Colorado River Basin, groundwater is disappearing much faster than Lake Mead (Circle of Blue)

The mineral-stained canyon walls and the plunging water levels at Lake Mead, the nation’s largest reservoir, are the most visible signs of the driest 14-year period in the Colorado River Basin’s historical record.


June 23, 2014--California’s thirst is moving mountains (Postmedia)

California may be in the midst of a severe drought, but plump, juicy strawberries and raspberries continue to roll north by the truckload. And they are still affordable despite predictions of price shocks for Canadian consumers who gobble up California fruits, veggies and nuts worth close to $2.4 billion a year.


December 5, 2013--Report: Society's water safety net is fraying (Circle of Blue)

It is no exaggeration to claim that aquifers, water-saturated layers of subterranean sediment, have allowed agriculture, and thus modern life in our house of 7 billion, to prosper. America's Great Plains are a lucrative grain bin solely because of the Ogallala Aquifer, which waters eight states.


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