Nutrients

Animas Watershed Assembly and Partnership

12/03/2015 6:00 pm

Join the Animas Watershed Partnership (AWP) and speakers on December 3rd at the Durango Library (1900 E 3rd Ave, Durango, CO 81301) for information about the Colorado Watershed Assembly and septic systems from San Juan Basin Health. Presentations by Brian Devine and Chad Engelhardt with the Environmental Health Division at San Juan Basin Health.


March 12, 2015--New fertilizer heralded for yield, lower water demand (TheCalifornian.com)

A new type of fertilizer introduced in Salinas last week has been shown to reduce nitrogen runoff, increase yield and lower water demand, particularly for almonds, a $246 million crop in Tulare County, while using produce scraps as a base ingredient. Still in early stage expansion mode, Sacramento-based California Safe Soil, or CSS, has plans to build five plants over the next five years a


March 5, 2015--Nutrient pollution damages streams in ways previously unknown, ecologists find (Science Daily)

An important food resource has been disappearing from streams without anyone noticing until now. In a new study published March 6 in the journal Science, a team of researchers led by University of Georgia ecologists reports that nutrient pollution causes a significant loss of forest-derived carbon from stream ecosystems, reducing the ability of streams to support aquatic life


January 11, 2015--Study: Earth’s fresh-water resources at risk (Blade)

Although western Lake Erie has become an international poster child for noxious algae, a new study suggests that many of the world’s much smaller, cleaner, and calmer bodies of water are likewise in trouble if greater efforts are not undertaken to keep farm fertilizers and other nutrients out of them.


December 15, 2014--Healthy Animas, healthy animals (Durango Herald)

Potentially, harmfully high levels of nutrients are flowing from the Florida River into the Animas River, and one project is hoping to make a dent in the problem. The Animas Watershed Partnership and rancher Keith Fassbender recently finished fencing almost a mile of the Florida River west of the Durango-La Plata County Airport as part of the effort.


May 27, 2014--How healthy is the Animas River? (Cortez Journal)

The swiftly flowing Animas River ran turbid here Monday, but that was the least of Melissa May’s concerns as she dipped water samples to be analyzed for various qualities. The main focus of the San Juan Watershed Group research is E. coli and nutrients – nitrogen and phosphorus. Certain strains of the former can cause nausea, fever and vomiting.


March 28, 2014--Can a water pollution credit plan help clean up our waterways? (Fast Company)

Excess nutrients are flooding into rivers and causing suffocating algae blooms. A major project hopes to get farmers and companies working together to fix the problem at the lowest cost to everyone. When too much nitrogen and phosphorus runs into lakes and rivers, the result is a bloom of algae that--if it gets bad enough--can suffocate fish and other life in the water.


March 27, 2014--Report explores nutrient management in water utility sector (Johnson Foundation)

In the past century, population growth, urbanization and intensified agricultural practices have combined to increase strain on wastewater treatment facilities. A foremost challenge for utilities is managing nutrient levels in the water—and doing so while juggling economic and energy constraints.


February 23, 2014--E. coli levels in Animas are mixed (Durango Herald)

A study last year found that the level of E. coli bacteria in the Animas River just north of the New Mexico state line met water-quality standards but exceeded them in the New Mexico stretch of the river. E. coli levels in the San Juan River above its confluence with the Animas at Farmington also were above the limit. The E.


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