Metropolitan Water District of Southern California

March 18, 2016--EPA, US Bureau of Reclamation and Western water districts collaborate on ICP (Hydrocarbon Engineering)

Three of the West’s largest municipal water agencies have partnered with federal agencies to kick off the latest round of an expanded competitive grant programme aimed at discovering the next generation of water saving devices and technologies. For the first time, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is participating with the US Bureau of Reclamation, as well as the Central A


March 13, 2015--As drought worsens, L.A. water agency offers cash to Sacramento Valley farmers (Sacramento Bee)

With the drought stretching into its fourth year, a heavyweight water agency from Los Angeles has come calling on Sacramento Valley rice farmers, offering up to $71 million for some of their water. The price being offered is so high, some farmers can make more from selling water than from growing their rice.


February 26, 2015--California has entered fourth year of drought, water experts say (San Gabriel Valley Tribune)

State water officials are preparing for the fourth straight year of drought and are readying more restrictive water conservation measures under an extension of the governor’s water emergency plan.


October 8, 2014--Colorado River water-conservation effort to begin (Las Vegas Sun)

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation on Wednesday began soliciting project proposals for water conservation from Colorado River entitlement holders in Arizona, California and Nevada. Water users in the river's Upper Basin will be invited to participate in the agreement at a later date.


‘Big Boys’ Reach Landmark Water Conservation Agreement

In August, the Central Arizona Project, Denver Water, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, and Southern Nevada Water Authority all signed on to what is being called a landmark water conservation agreement aimed at demonstrating “the viability of cooperative, voluntary compensated measures,” according to a press release from Denver Water. With Colorado River water supplies dwindling, these organizations--the biggest water users at the table--said they’ll invest $11 million to try and conserve significant amounts of water across all sectors, including agricultural, municipal, and industrial uses.

August 5, 2014--To protect hydropower, utilities will pay Colorado River water users to conserve (High Country News)

Here’s a sure sign that your region’s in drought: you stop paying your utility for the privilege of using water, and the utility starts paying you not to use water instead. Outlandish as it sounds, that’s what four major Western utilities and the federal government are planning to do next year through the $11 million Colorado River Conservation Partnership.


August 3, 2014--Western water suppliers reach Colorado River conservation agreement (Summit Daily)

Denver Water joined forces last week with water providers in Arizona, California and Nevada and the federal government to sign a water conservation agreement. The Colorado River System Conservation program is an effort to address a long-term imbalance on the Colorado River caused by years of drought and water demands that exceed supply.


July 31, 2014--Major Colorado River players announce conservation push (Summit Voice)

With Colorado River water supplies disappearing at a dizzying rate, and with a thirsty — and politically mighty — California parched by drought, the biggest water users at the table said this week they’ll invest $11 million to try and conserve significant amounts of water across all sectors, including including agricultural, municipal and industrial uses.


New Program Pays Users to Conserve Colorado River Water

Farmers, cities, and power plant operators could soon be paid to cut their use of the Colorado River under a new interstate program aimed at keeping more water in Lake’s Powell and Mead. The four largest communities fed by the Colorado River will contribute millions of dollars into a fund to help farmers and industrial operations pay for efficiency improvements and conservation measures to cut their water use. Known as the Colorado River System Conservation Program, it will be seeded with $2 million each from the Central Arizona Water Conservation District, Denver Water, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, and the Southern Nevada Water Authority. Another $3 million will come from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.


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