Drinking Water

March 19, 2009--Quality Water protection planning starts (Fort Morgan Times)

Because area residents, farming operations and entire subdivisions rely on the Morgan County Quality Water District for their primary source of water, a team of stakeholders met for the first time Tuesday

March 19, 2009--Army Corps helps with arsenic removal systems (U.S. Water News)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is helping build water treatment systems that will reduce arsenic levels in water used by thousands of Rio Rancho and Bernalillo residents.

March 19, 2009--Clean water for the world (La Junta Tribune Democrat)

Demand for clean water is rising just as access to safe drinking water and sanitation remains inadequate, officials from the United Nations said Monday during the first day of a global water forum in

March 16, 2009--World Water Forum opens to scarcity fears and protests (Environmental News Service)

Global demand for water is greater today than it has ever been and demand will increase in the future, thousands of delegates to the Fifth World Water Forum in Istanbul heard at their opening session today

March 7, 2009--New water regs costly for communities (Pueblo Chieftain)

Cities and small water districts in the Lower Arkansas Valley could be facing a new financial crisis in trying to meet new limits for radioactive particles in their drinking water supplies. Meanwhile, backers of Arkansas Valley Conduit say it would be the only effective way to avoid paying for costly new systems to treat the groundwater.

March 5, 2009--Tanker spills 5,000 gallons of toxic gas (Grand Junction Sentinel)

Quick action by local authorities and help from law enforcement across the Western Slope helped contain a massive spill of a highly flammable, toxic chemical that traveled down Rifle’s main road after a tanker rolled Thursday morning.

March 5, 2009--Army Corps helps with arsenic removal systems (U.S. Water News)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is helping build water treatment systems that will reduce arsenic levels in water used by thousands of Rio Rancho and Bernalillo residents. The Corps says the systems are designed to be a relatively inexpensive way water utilities can reduce arsenic levels from the old federal standard of 50 parts per billion to 10 parts per billion.

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