U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

October 12, 2016--Protecting our Colorado River (Morning Consult)

Water makes the West as we know it. Congressman Wayne Aspinall put it best: In the West, when you touch water, you touch everything.

October 9, 2016--Environmentalists dismayed by Glen Canyon Dam management plan (AZ Daily Sun)

Environmental groups are criticizing the final draft of a plan released by the Bureau of Reclamation Friday to manage the operations of Glen Canyon Dam for the next 20 years. The plan&

October 8, 2016--Bridging science and policy for better water strategies--Part 3 (Arizona State University)

It's 118 at Lake Mead on a July afternoon, but the thermometer on the boat’s depth finder says the lake is a cool 67 degrees. Naturally, you jump in. It tastes earthy and mossy, if mossy can be a taste, and ultimately it’s what 30 million people survive on. This is the stuff and place thousands of professionals are focused on.

September 9, 2016--Mancos water district continues reservoir title transfer (Cortez Journal)

This summer, the Mancos Water Conservancy District has continued investigating a possible title transfer for the Jackson Gulch Project, Superintendent Gary Kennedy said Wednesday. The district has been pursuing a transfer of ownership from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, so that the district could be the sole owner of the reservoir project.

September 7, 2016--The forecast for Lake Mead: Hot and dry with plenty of anxiety (Los Angeles Times)

A reckoning arrives every August for the Colorado River and the 40 million people across the West who depend on it. After water managers measure annual inflows and outflows and do their best to estimate future precipitation in places as far-flung as northwestern Wyoming and southwestern New Mexico, they make a pronouncement that once was arcane but has become increasingly prominent —

September 5, 2016--Fed's back off from Lake Mead water demand (Tucson.com)

It sounded too good to be true — an official forecast that 2016 water use in Arizona, California and Nevada will be the lowest since 1992. That forecast from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation was too good to be true — by the bureau’s own admission. It was widely reported recently as a sign of major progress toward conservation.

August 20, 2016--“Climate change is water change” — why the Colorado River system is headed for trouble (Washington Post)

There’s good news and bad news for the drought-stricken Colorado River system, according to projections just released in a new federal report from the Bureau of Reclamation, manager of dams, powerplants and canals. The report predicts that Lake Mead — the river system’s largest reservoir, supplying water to millions of people in Nevada, Arizona, C

August 15, 2016--Groundwater recharge in Upper Colorado River Basin may hold steady under climate change (USGS)

Future groundwater replenishment in the Upper Colorado River Basin may benefit from projected increases in future basin-wide precipitation under current climate projections, according to a recent study by the U.S. Geological Survey and Bureau of Reclamation. The Colorado River provides water for more than 35 million people in the United States and 3 million people in Mexico.

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