U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

February 9, 2016--Lake Nighthorse assessment available soon for comment (Cortez Journal)

An environmental assessment and other documentation on Lake Nighthorse may soon be available for public review and comment, bringing residents a step closer to recreational use, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation officials say. Kathleen Ozga, resource division manager for the Bureau of Reclamation Western Colorado Area Office, said the comment period will last 30 days.


January 23, 2016--Despite El Niño, BuRec predicts average year (Montrose Press)

El Niño has showered its bounty on the region, particularly the Four Corners area south of Montrose.


January 16, 2016--How federal policies are eroding the San Joaquin Valley floor (Water Deeply)

The San Joaquin Valley floor has been sinking for decades. So much water has been pumped out of wells in this arid agricultural zone that the land’s surface has caved downward almost 30 feet in places.


January 11, 2016--Department of the Interior proposes adaptive management framework for Glen Canyon Dam (St. George News)

The U.S. Department of the Interior released a proposed framework Friday for adaptively managing Glen Canyon Dam over the next 20 years with the goal of creating certainty and predictability for power and water users while protecting environmental and cultural resources in Grand Canyon National Park and the Colorado River ecosystem.


BOR Training: Modern Methods in Canal Operation and Control (Denver, CO)

02/22/2016 8:00 am
02/26/2016 5:00 pm

Sponsored by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, this Modern Methods in Canal Operation and Contro​l workshop provides an excellent opportunity to become familiar with current water management techniques and technology.


BOR Training: Basic Principles and Developments in Flow Measurement (Denver, CO)

02/02/2016 8:49 am
02/04/2016 5:00 pm

Sponsored by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, this Basic Principles and Developments in Flow Measurement  workshop provides an excellent opportunity to become familiar with current water management techniques and technology.


The Colorado River Desalination Plant

According to a High Country News article, the Paradox Valley in western Colorado was formed millions of years ago, when a huge dome of salt collapsed. Now, that salt remains and the waters of the Dolores River pick it up and carry it to the Colorado River, where it eventually degrades the water quality for downstream users. For nearly 50 years the Paradox Valley Unit, which is operated by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, has been treating the salt problem. According to the article, the unit treats nearly 200 gallons of brine every minute—this is seven times saltier than ocean water. The brine is then injected into a formation about 2.5 miles beneath the Earth’s surface. The formation, however, will eventually fill up rendering the unit useless. According to the HCN article, there are no obvious replacement options, and officials do not know how long they have left, but estimate 10 to 20 years. 


U.S. BOR Grant Opportunity: Water Conservation Field Services Program--January 11, 2016 Deadline!

The funding opportunity announcement (BOR-UC-16-F001) for the Water Conservation Field Services Program Grant is now available on grants.gov and will close January 11, 2016, 4:00 p.m.  Mountain Standard Time. 


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