Western Resource Advocates

October 30, 2015--Land use must consider water supply, speakers say (Durango Herald)

Land use choices and water use are connected. So how come water people and land use planners don't work together as water supply becomes more at risk and state population keeps growing? That was the focus of a water and land use forum on Oct. 23 at the La Plata County Administration Building.


September 20, 2015--Utilities missing opportunity to raise revenue, study shows (Water Online)

Research shows that utilities are missing the chance to use a tool that could raise revenue. A new report by Western Resource Advocates, Ceres, and the University of North Carolina’s Environmental Finance Center shows that “very few water utilities are utilizing water connection charges to increase water-conserving residential development projects,” according to Envir


July 27, 2015--Water-efficiency upgrades urged for Southwest (Arizona Central)

Arizona and the Southwest are dumping too much water down the drain, but the waste could be reduced by efficiency upgrades that pay for themselves, a conservation group contends. Governments and utilities already save energy nationwide through the use of performance contracts — deals that pay contractors only for proven cost savings.


June 24, 2015--Lake Mead sinks to record low, risking water shortage (USA Today)

Lake Mead sunk to a record low Tuesday night, falling below the point that would trigger a water-supply shortage if the reservoir doesn't recover soon. Water managers expect the lake's level to rebound enough to ward off a 2016 shortage thanks to a wetter-than-expected spring. But in the long run, as a U.S.


June 10, 2015--Developing Colorado with water conservation in mind (KRCC)

Colorado has experienced massive population growth in the last few years, and that trend is projected to continue. State Demographer Elizabeth Garner says the population of Colorado is forecast to grow by more than 2 million by 2040 to approximately 7.8 million people.


May 18, 2015--Colorado's growth brings a call to link water and land planning (KUNC)

Colorado has experienced massive population growth in the last few years, a trend that is projected to continue. Finding enough water to meet the demands of the booming Front Range has city planners closely looking at how new developments can be built with conservation as a key component.


February 8, 2015--Water plan must focus on conservation, not diversion (Post Independent)

Until 50 years ago, dams and water diversions were seen by many as symbols of progress, ingenuity and man’s triumph over nature. By 1970 we had built 100,000 dams in rivers and creeks across the country, and their negative impacts — on fish, wildlife, wetlands, recreation and communities — were becoming increasingly visible.


December 31, 2014--Planning for population growth and water scarcity in the West (Colorado Springs Independent)

'We are booming," says Jorge Figueroa, water policy analyst for Western Resource Advocates. In population, that is. But there's a problem: "You can't have growth if you don't have water." According to a 2014 Colorado Department of Local Affairs report, Colorado is expected to see an additional 2.5 million people by 2040.


November 30, 2014--A call for conservation (Pueblo Chieftain)

Environmental groups see a new direction for Colorado water development based on comments on the state water plan in the past year. “We heard loud and clear from the comments from people all over the state that conservation is needed,” said Bart Miller, water program director for Western Resource Advocates.


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