Animas River

December 18, 2015--For enviro groups, Gold King spill intensifies mission (Durango Herald)

Though the Animas River has returned to its normal shades of blue, not all has returned to normal since last summer’s Gold King Mine spill. For a handful of local environmental groups, operations have vastly changed since the national spotlight turned on Southwest Colorado on Aug.


December 17, 2015--Gold King talks launched, locals seek voice and EPA funding proof (Denver Post)

More than four months after the Gold King blowout, toxic orange-hued waste still drains into headwaters of the Animas River — and some residents want the Environmental Protection Agency to consider draining a plugged nearby mine to enable a better cleanup. "Then we could go in and mine it again," said Silverton resident and f


December 16, 2015--Water monitoring plans may bring Four Corners together (Durango Herald)

Agreeing that collaboration is key, New Mexico environmental officials extended a hand in partnership to La Plata County during a Wednesday meeting about long-term water monitoring plans. Four months after an Environmental Protection Agency-caused spill at the Gold King Mine in Silverton sent 3 million gallons of acidic wastewater into the Animas and San Juan rivers work continues f


November 16, 2015--History in the headlines (Durango Herald)

Recently released archival photos of mine tailing pits above Silverton highlight that not much has changed when it comes to complaints about mine waste since the region’s early settlement. “Ranchers and farmers who want to use water for irrigation in the lower valley have always attempted to force the mine and mill operators to keep the tailings from polluting the streams; howe


November 14, 2015--Silverton leaders leaning toward Superfund after Gold Kine Mine spill (Denver Post)

For roughly two decades, Silverton has rebuffed federal Superfund dollars to clean up the scores of abandoned mines leaching contaminants into its surroundings. But in the wake of the Gold King Mine spill, and under immense pressure from its downstream neighbors, the southwestern Colorado town's leaders are now leaning toward endorsing the controversial remedy.&nbsp


November 13, 2015--Metal sediment unlikely to dissolve (Durango Herald)

Scientists working on heavy metals in the Animas River delivered some good news about the sediment Friday. Metals in the sediment left by the August Gold King Mine breach are likely to wash downstream without dissolving, and this could avoid a more toxic environment for aquatic life, a panel of experts said at Fort Lewis College. The perfect spring weather would bring flows of 6,000 t


November 11, 2015--Superfund tour through Colorado paints positive picture (Durango Herald)

It was a long, difficult road as the community of Leadville went through a more-than-20-year process through the Environmental Protection Agency’s hazardous cleanup Superfund program.


Animas Watershed Assembly and Partnership

12/03/2015 6:00 pm

Join the Animas Watershed Partnership (AWP) and speakers on December 3rd at the Durango Library (1900 E 3rd Ave, Durango, CO 81301) for information about the Colorado Watershed Assembly and septic systems from San Juan Basin Health. Presentations by Brian Devine and Chad Engelhardt with the Environmental Health Division at San Juan Basin Health.


November 1, 2015--Stakeholders focus on Animas (Durango Herald)

Not wanting to let attention waiver on the need to improve water quality in the Animas River watershed, key stakeholders on Sunday held an informational open house at the La Plata County Fairgrounds. “If there is a silver lining, it’s that now there is all this awareness concerning the health of the river,” said Ann Oliver of the Animas Watershed Partnership. 


October 30, 2015--"Good Samaritan" legislation on agenda (Associated Press)

Congressional Republicans revived "Good Samaritan" legislation Thursday designed to encourage companies and nonprofits to help clean up thousands of abandoned mines across the nation by protecting them from liability for environmental accidents. The proposal was one of three the House Natural Resources Committee unveiled after the Environmental Protection Agency inadvertently unl


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