Animas River

January 27, 2016--EPA blamed for delay on Superfund in Silverton (Durango Herald)

Frustration for failing to meet a Jan. 31 deadline to be considered for a Superfund listing this spring was evident Tuesday night in Silverton, but the town’s hired attorneys assured elected officials negotiations have not derailed. 


January 17, 2016--Silverton to EPA: Keep Gold King sludge out of Animas (Denver Post)

Colorado mountain residents hardest-hit by the EPA-triggered Gold King Mine disaster say they'd like to make Silverton a research hub to find a better way — beyond building water treatment plants — to deal with thousands of mines leaking toxic acids. Since August, the Environmental Protection Agency has relied on a temporary plant to remove millions of tons of metals sludge


Interactive Forests-to-Faucets Teacher Workshop Maps

Beginning in 2012, the Water Information Program in conjuction with the Mountain Studies Institure and the San Juan Mountains Association began a series of two-day intensive teacher training workshops. Visit their websites to for an interactive workshop tour on the Animas, San Juan, and Dolores Rivers.


December 20, 2015--La Plata County tests for elements not previously sampled at Gold King Mine (Durango Herald)

An independent analysis of sediment at the Gold King Mine adit found trace amounts of uranium isotopes, but at levels far below typical screening thresholds. The study was done in September by Wright Water Engineers on behalf of La Plata County government.


December 19, 2015--State official who clashed with EPA over mine spill resigns (Associated Press)

Colorado's top environmental official is stepping down, months after he clashed with federal authorities over a massive spill of toxic wastewater from an inactive mine in southwest Colorado. Mike King's resignation was announced Thursday. The executive director of the Colorado Department of Natural Resources had led the agency since 2010. King clashed with the U.S.


December 18, 2015--For enviro groups, Gold King spill intensifies mission (Durango Herald)

Though the Animas River has returned to its normal shades of blue, not all has returned to normal since last summer’s Gold King Mine spill. For a handful of local environmental groups, operations have vastly changed since the national spotlight turned on Southwest Colorado on Aug.


December 17, 2015--Gold King talks launched, locals seek voice and EPA funding proof (Denver Post)

More than four months after the Gold King blowout, toxic orange-hued waste still drains into headwaters of the Animas River — and some residents want the Environmental Protection Agency to consider draining a plugged nearby mine to enable a better cleanup. "Then we could go in and mine it again," said Silverton resident and f


December 16, 2015--Water monitoring plans may bring Four Corners together (Durango Herald)

Agreeing that collaboration is key, New Mexico environmental officials extended a hand in partnership to La Plata County during a Wednesday meeting about long-term water monitoring plans. Four months after an Environmental Protection Agency-caused spill at the Gold King Mine in Silverton sent 3 million gallons of acidic wastewater into the Animas and San Juan rivers work continues f


November 16, 2015--History in the headlines (Durango Herald)

Recently released archival photos of mine tailing pits above Silverton highlight that not much has changed when it comes to complaints about mine waste since the region’s early settlement. “Ranchers and farmers who want to use water for irrigation in the lower valley have always attempted to force the mine and mill operators to keep the tailings from polluting the streams; howe


November 14, 2015--Silverton leaders leaning toward Superfund after Gold Kine Mine spill (Denver Post)

For roughly two decades, Silverton has rebuffed federal Superfund dollars to clean up the scores of abandoned mines leaching contaminants into its surroundings. But in the wake of the Gold King Mine spill, and under immense pressure from its downstream neighbors, the southwestern Colorado town's leaders are now leaning toward endorsing the controversial remedy.&nbsp


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