Runoff

May 26, 2011--McPhee will spill big (Cortez Journal)

Whitewater boaters can slip on their wetsuits, grab their oars and head for the Lower Dolores River after reservoir management announced a high-flow dam spill planned for the duration of Memorial Day Weekend.


May 23, 2011--Spring runoff: Landslide closes highway in Wyoming (Summit Voice)

A major landslide has closed a highway in Wyoming’s Snake River Canyon, and smaller slides have been reported in the Granite Creek, Greys River and Gros Ventre drainages, as record snowpack, combined with spring rains, have saturated soils at lower elevations in the northern Rockies.


May 22, 2011--Record snowpacks could threaten Western states (New York Times)

For all the attention on epic flooding in the Mississippi Valley, a quiet threat has been growing here in the West where winter snows have piled up on mountain ranges throughout the region.


May 19, 2011--Late storms add to historic flood worries in West (Denver Post)

Late winter storms are packing a punch to the Rockies, piling snowpack on top of already record levels across the West where officials are concerned about historic flooding, avalanches and mudslides. "At this point, everybody is just sitting back chewing fingernails and waiting because the longer it stays cold and wet, the worse it's going to get," said Randy Julander, a superv

May 16, 2011--The year in water (High Country News)

La Niña ruled the West's weather this winter, and states now sitting on lavish snowpacks couldn't be happier. Cooler surface temperatures in the equatorial Pacific are responsible for the high precipitation rates in California, the Northwest and Intermountain West. Those snowpacks are expected to melt at a leisurely rate, buoying streamflows throughout the summer.


May 5, 2011--Flooding feared amid runoff from record Colorado snowpack (Denver Post)

A record Colorado snowpack has the potential to cause record flooding this spring if it doesn't start trickling off the mountains soon, and federal agencies are watching n


Dust to Get Worse

Desert dust blowing from the Southwest into the Rockies has been implicated in everything from earlier snowmelt and air quality violations to causing avalanches. A new study indicates these storms will become more frequent and intense as increased temperature kill desert vegetation. A research team from the U.S. Geological Survey and UCLA looked at climate, vegetation, and soil measurements collected over a 20-year period in Arches and Canyonlands National Parks in southeastern Utah. Long-term data indicated that perennial vegetation in grasslands and some shrublands declined with temperature increases. The study then used these soil and vegetation measurements in a model to project future wind erosion.


Weather Modication Workshop (Durango, CO)

05/20/2011 9:30 am
05/20/2011 12:00 pm

Sponsored by the Southwestern Water Conservation District (SWCD). This free workshop will be conduct at the SWCD office--841 East Second Avenue, Durango, CO. For more information call (970) 247-1302.


April 22, 2011--What consumers need to know before flood waters rise (CNN)

Is your neighborhood at risk from flood? Have you assumed that your homeowners or renters policy will replace your possessions if they are lost or damaged by a flood? The Colorado Division of Insurance reminds people to take stock of their belongings and check their insurance policies before the water starts to rise in their neighborhood.


April 14, 2011--San Miguel, Dolores watershed snowpack levels below average (Telluride Watch)

With a number of strong winter storms seeming to bypass southwestern Colorado this past winter, it’s no surprise that San Miguel, Dolores, Animas, San Juan, and Rio Grand

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