Reservoirs

January 30, 2015--Unusually high temperatures, low snow pack could spell trouble for Utah’s water needs (Fox 13)

Five degrees for six months: Those are numbers that cause serious concern for Utah water experts. Brian McInerney, Hydrologist for the National Weather Service, said from August through January, northern Utah has averaged temperatures five degrees higher than normal. “Which is incredibly significant when you talk about snow pack,” McInerney said.


January 30, 2015--Scientists see shrinking California snowpack as a harbinger (Los Angeles Times)

State workers performed a California winter ritual Thursday, poking hollow aluminum tubes into Sierra Nevada meadows to measure the snowpack. In what scientists see as a harbinger, they didn't find much. "We will conceivably see more years like this in the future," said geologist Jeffrey Mount, a senior fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California.


January 29, 2015--Hickenlooper: Water usage not storage will solve Colorado's shortfall (Denver Post)

The population growth in Colorado and other western states cannot continue unless water supply challenges are met, Gov. John Hickenlooper and state planners said Thursday in opening the Colorado Water Congress annual conference.


January 24, 2015--Scientists measure reservoir evaporation to gauge water scarcity (Water Online)

Scientists are trying out a new approach to drought and water scarcity monitoring: They are measuring how much water evaporates from reservoirs in order to provide a more accurate picture of how much water is available.


January 9, 2015--Overall, Colorado’s snowpack is on target (Durango Herald)

As a whole, Colorado’s snowpack was right where it should have been Jan. 1 – standing at 99 percent of the median for the date, the Natural Resources Conservation Service said in a news release.


November 28, 2014--In Wyoming, governor doesn't want to let water leave state (Billings Gazette)

Every spring, John Joyce watches as thousands of gallons of water in the Nowood River rush by his ranch in northern Wyoming. It’s water that eventually moves into the Bighorn, Yellowstone, Missouri and Mississippi rivers before dumping into the Gulf of Mexico.


October 30, 2014--Hydropower may be huge source of methane emissions (Climate Central)

Imagine nearly 6,000 dairy cows doing what cows do, belching and being flatulent for a full year. That’s how much methane was emitted from one Ohio reservoir in 2012. Reservoirs and hydropower are often thought of as climate friendly because they don’t burn fossil fuels to produce electricity.


August 30, 2014--Water storage ‘absolutely’ part of plan (Grand Junction Sentinel)

Western Slope water storage is “absolutely” a part of the Colorado water plan that is to be complete in just over a year, said the head of the Colorado Water Conservation Board. James Eklund, however, declined to offer specifics about any discussions. U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton, R-Colo., this week told the editorial board of The Daily Sentinel that he and Gov.


June 30, 2014--Movement of carbon in large U.S. rivers affected by reservoirs, finds study (Water World)

A new study conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists, and published in the Journal of Geophysical Research – Biogeosciences, has found that a combination of climate and human activities (diversion and reservoirs) controls the movement of carbon in two large western river basins, the Colorado and the Missouri Rivers.


June 29, 2014--Water panel identifies wish list (La Junta Tribune)

During the third annual Protein Producer Summit, a joint summer business meeting of the Colorado Cattlemen’s Association and the Colorado Livestock Association, four panelists shared a wish list of items they think could improve the state’s ability to fully capture and utilize its water resources. More storage is needed!


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