Press Clippings

October 30, 2014--Hydropower may be huge source of methane emissions (Climate Central)

Imagine nearly 6,000 dairy cows doing what cows do, belching and being flatulent for a full year. That’s how much methane was emitted from one Ohio reservoir in 2012. Reservoirs and hydropower are often thought of as climate friendly because they don’t burn fossil fuels to produce electricity.


October 30, 2014--Selling and buying water rights (National Science Foundation)

Trying to sell or buy water rights can be a complicated exercise. First, it takes time and effort for buyers and sellers to find each other, a process that often relies on word-of-mouth, local bulletin boards, even calling friends and neighbors to get the word out. Then they must deal with the maze of rules and regulations involved.


October 29, 2014--New river water samples to be tested for human waste (Daily Times)

A local environmental group this week finished collecting samples as part of a long-term study that already suggests septic waste may be seeping from sewage systems or being dumped from San Juan County into the San Juan and Animas rivers. The two-year study includes samples collected from five sites along the two rivers in and just outside the county.


October 29, 2014--First kokanee spawning at Nighthorse (Durango Herald)

From a platform tethered 100 feet offshore, members of a Colorado Parks and Wildlife team spawned kokanee salmon in Lake Nighthorse for the first time. Members of this first graduating class of kokanee were stocked as fingerlings in 2010. Stocking 75,000 kokanee each year since means spawning will occur annually.


October 29, 2014--Durango wastewater-plant repair deadline extends (Durango Herald)

The Durango wastewater-treatment plant will not have to make millions of dollars worth of improvements by 2017 to meet new clean water guidelines, after negotiations with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.


October 28, 2014--World losing 2,000 hectares of farm soil daily to salt damage (Environmental News Network)

Salt-spoiled soils worldwide: 20% of all irrigated lands — an area equal to size of France; Extensive costs include $27 billion+ in lost crop value / year. UNU study identifies ways to reverse damage, says every hectare needed to feed world’s fast-growing population.


October 28, 2014-- $300K grant to address pollution cleanup of Little Colorado River (White Mountain Independent)

Two grants totaling $327,000 have been awarded to address polluted runoff into the Little Colorado River area of Apache County. The grants are two of eight in Arizona this year administered by the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality’s Water Quality Improvement Grant program to address polluted runoff from many different sources.


October 28, 2014--Is there enough water for people and nuts? (Modesto Bee)

Do almond barons put us at water risk? Long, long ago (mid-1800s), in a land far, far away (Lake Tahoe), eager opportunists seized on what became known as “green gold.” Ancient stands of virgin timber were decimated to support mining and railroad development.


October 28, 20144--Earth’s soil is getting too salty for crops to grow (Smithsonian)

In the upcoming film Interstellar, Earth’s soil has become so degraded that only corn will grow, driving humans to travel through a wormhole in search of a planet with land fertile enough for other crops. In the real world things aren’t quite so dire, but degraded soil is a big problem—and one that could be getting worse.


October 27, 2014--Water official: Address Western Slope concerns (Grand Junction Sentinel)

A Western Slope water official wants to make sure that even if a draft state water plan doesn’t solve conflicts over Colorado River basin issues, it at least fully acknowledges their existence. Dan Birch, deputy general manager of the Colorado River Water Conservation District, made the request in an Oct. 10 letter to the Colorado Water Conservation Board.


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