Press Clippings

August 21, 2014--Sen. Udall speaks on water conservation in Snowmass (Aspen Times)

Climate change is globally impacting natural resources, particularly water supplies, and that can’t go unchecked, U.S. Sen. Mark Udall said Wednesday in Snowmass Village.


August 20, 2014--If you think the water crisis can't get worse, wait until the aquifers are drained (National geographic)

Aquifers provide us freshwater that makes up for surface water lost from drought-depleted lakes, rivers, and reservoirs. We are drawing down these hidden, mostly nonrenewable groundwater supplies at unsustainable rates in the western United States and in several dry regions globally, threatening our future. We are at our best when we can see a threat or challenge ahead.


August 20, 2014--Will Front Range growth trump river health? (Post Independent)

Climate change might not be the end-all, be-all in the state’s water discussion, but Brad Udall knows it needs to at least be a part of it.


August 20, 2014--Lake Powell water releases to Lake Mead will increase in 2015 (Parker Pioneer)

Based on the August 24-Month Study, which is the Bureau of Reclamation's monthly operational study, the water release from Lake Powell to Lake Mead for water year 2015 will be 8.23 million acre-feet. This is an increase from the 2014 release of 7.48 maf, which was the lowest release since Lake Powell filled in the 1960s.


August 19, 2014--Global warming spells trouble for fish populations in desert rivers of the Southwest (Summit Voice)

Big sections of vulnerable stream habitat for native fish in the Southwest are likely to disappear by mid-century as global warming causes stream flows to dwindle. By 2050, stream-drying events could increase by 17 percent, and the number of zero-flow days could go up by 27 percent in t


August 19, 2014--Colorado startup smooths flow of water-rights information in West (Denver Business Journal)

A startup company with its roots in mining and analyzing data about the oil and gas industry has turned its sights on another critical commodity: water in the West. Water, in Colorado and much of the west, is considered a property right, similar to land.


August 18, 2014--The cup's half full without groundwater regulation (Los Angeles Times)

They're all patting themselves on the back in the state Capitol for finally achieving a water bond deal. And that's fine. It was a momentous act. But what really would be historic — and worth running self-congratulatory reelection ads about — would be to pair the bond proposal with even more important groundwater regulation.

August 18, 2014--Only bold action will save the Colorado River (Arizona Central)

Reservoirs once filled to the brim from the Colorado and its tributaries are at historic lows due to an unprecedented drought and growing human demands. Shrunken stream flows now pose serious challenges for wildlife and recreation, as well as cities, farms and others who rely upon the river.


Syndicate content