New Mexico

September 22, 2016--Animas River water fight headed to trial (Santa Fe New Mexican)

A yearslong dispute over water rights on the Animas River will finally go to trial in state District Court following a New Mexico Supreme Court ruling Thursday that the state engineer has full authority to regulate how water on the river is managed and diverted. The state engineer filed a complaint in District Court in 2013 against the Diamond K Bar Ranch in San Juan County, accusing the r

September 10, 2016--New Mexico water officials eye pipeline to Colorado lake (Farmington Times)

A water commission is eyeing a possible pipeline from a Colorado lake to northern New Mexico. The Daily Times reports San Juan Water Commission members will meet in October to weigh having the pipeline designed at an estimated cost of $10,000 to $15,000. Further study could cost up to $250,000. Lake Nighthorse in southern Colorado is managed by the Bureau of Reclamation. The

August 2, 2016--Sunnyside Gold Corp. calls for dismissal of New Mexico lawsuit (Durango Herald)

Twenty-five years ago Tuesday, Sunnyside Gold Corp. shuttered the last operating mine in Silverton, yet the company’s involvement in the region is very much alive. On Friday, Sunnyside – now owned by international mining conglomerate Kinross Gold Corp.

June 23, 2016--New Mexico sues Colorado over Gold King Mine spill (Durango Herald)

New Mexico is suing the state of Colorado, saying its northern neighbor should be held responsible for the contamination from a massive mine waste spill last year as well as decades of toxic drainage from mines near the headwaters of a shared river. The New Mexico Attorney General’s Office and the state Environment Department announced late Wednesday that they fil

June 1, 2016--Navajo farmland without water (Atlantic)

Tens of thousands of acres of farmland on the Navajo Nation have been without water for more than week because of a broken pipeline that may not be fixed until next month. The farmland, located in Farmington, New Mexico, is managed by the Navajo Agricultural Products Industry (NAPI) and produces products under the “Navajo Pride” brand. Most of the crops at the Farmington f

May 18, 2016--Gold King Mine spill issues dissected at conference (Durango Herald)

 About 130 people gathered for the first day of a mining conference aimed at better understanding the environmental conditions facing the Animas and San Juan rivers. Hosted by the New Mexico Water Resource Research Institute, various local and municipal agencies throughout three states, two Native American tribes and three Environmental Protection Agency regions attended sessions

February 27, 2016--New Mexico, Navajo Nation prepare for spring run-off carrying heavy metals (NMED News)

While temperatures warm and the high altitude snowpack in Colorado’s Southern Rockies & San Juan Mountains begins to melt, Animas/San Juan watershed communities are getting ready for the re-disturbance of toxic heavy metals in their primary water source. The U.S.

November 7, 2015--Will New Mexico lose its last wild river? (Audubon)

On a humid, blue-skied morning in July, Jarrod Swackhamer led a tiny group through the cottonwood and black walnut trees and open fields along southwestern New Mexico’s Gila River, downstream of where it pours out of the Gila National Forest, the nation’s first designated wilderness area.

September 7, 2015--Gold King spill stirs concerns about New Mexico’s old mines (Durango Herald)

The ongoing fallout in New Mexico from last month’s Colorado mine spill is a stark reminder that the “Land of Enchantment” has its own dangerous mines. While public officials continue to measure the damage wrought by the Gold King Mine spill, some say it’s a wake-up call to the staggering number of abandoned mines in New Mexico.

August 25, 2015--Drought done, but N.M. utilities push for conservation (Durango Herald)

Water managers across New Mexico aren’t giving up on their push for residents to conserve water even though severe drought has disappeared. For the first time in more than four years, federal maps show the worst levels of drought are gone from the state, and only abnormally dry to moderate conditions exist in the western half of the state. A healthy monsoon season is to thank, a

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