Lake Powell

Two West Slope Water Conservation Districts Jointly Adopt Principles for Addressing Colorado River Drought Conditions

The two Water Conservation Districts that comprise the entire Colorado River basin in Colorado adopted implementation principles concerning how the current, extended drought conditions are addressed on the Colorado River’s storage system.

October 13, 2016--Planning for drought; pilot program pays users for water conservation (St. George News)

Water managers are testing the effectiveness of temporary, voluntary measures that could be used to keep the water level in Lake Powell above what is needed to maintain power production at the Glen Canyon Dam. The Utah Division of Water Resources and the Upper Colorado River Commission are overseeing the “Pilot System Water Conservation Program,” which has been extend


October 9, 2016--Environmentalists dismayed by Glen Canyon Dam management plan (AZ Daily Sun)

Environmental groups are criticizing the final draft of a plan released by the Bureau of Reclamation Friday to manage the operations of Glen Canyon Dam for the next 20 years. The plan&


August 14, 2016--Study: Drought like 2000-2006 would empty Lake Powell (Aspen Daily News)

From his office along the Colorado River in Glenwood Springs, Eric Kuhn can see the bottom of Lake Powell. Kuhn, the general manager of the Colorado River District, has been working for months on a study asking if future droughts will drop water levels in Lake Powell so low that Glen Canyon Dam won’t be able to produce hydropower or release enough water to meet downstream demands.&nb


August 1, 2016--Minimal impacts from loss of Powell power, canyon institute says (Grand Junction Sentinel)

A group that wants to see the restoration of Glen Canyon and draining of Lake Powell says a new study shows such actions would have minimal impacts from the resulting loss of hydropower. The Glen Canyon Institute says the study it commissioned found there would be negligible impact on the western power grid and electric rates would go up by an average of 8 cents per month for


July 25, 2016--Snow, runoff and the Colorado River Basin (Mountain Town News)

From his office in Glenwood Springs overlooking the Colorado River, Eric Kuhn has become one of the West’s most prominent thinkers about the intersection of water, climate change, and allocations for farms, factories and cities, including ski towns. He joined the Colorado River Water Conservation District as an engineer after working in the private sector as a nuclear engin


July 9, 2016--Floating solar is a win-win energy solution for drought-stricken US lakes (Guardian)

The Colorado River’s two great reservoirs, Lake Mead and Lake Powell, are in retreat. Multi-year droughts and chronic overuse have taken their toll, to be sure, but vast quantities of water are also lost to evaporation.


June 20, 2016--Lake Powell on upward trend despite extra water released for Lake Mead (Lake Powell News)

Runoff on the Colorado River this past week has pushed Lake Powell to its highest level in four years. When the runoff ends in early July, the lake will be near 3,620 feet above mean sea level (msl). Even though runoff in 2016 was slightly below normal it was enough to boost Lake Powell 30 feet from the spring low in April.


June 19, 2016--Lake Powell on upward trend despite extra water released for Lake Mead (Lake Powell News)

Runoff on the Colorado River this past week has pushed Lake Powell to its highest level in four years. When the runoff ends in early July, the lake will be near 3,620 feet above mean sea level (msl). Even though runoff in 2016 was slightly below normal it was enough to boost Lake Powell 30 feet from the spring low in April.


May 31, 2016--As one of its chief sources of water dries pp, California eases restrictions on use nonetheless (ProPublica)

Earlier this month, California lifted its sweeping restrictions on how its towns and cities use their water, signaling that even though much of the state continues to face extraordinary drought, a moderately wet winter has blunted officials’ sense of urgency over water shortages. Seemingly overlooked, however, is the state’s enormous reliance on the Colorado River for its urban


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