Lake Mead

June 10, 2016--Collaborating to protect Lake Mead (Arizona Capitol Times)

The Central Arizona Project (CAP) and the Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR) recently hosted a second Colorado River Shortage Update. CAP and ADWR presented the latest information about the near-term outlook for the river and how Arizona can keep the river out of shortage in 2017.


June 2, 2016--What happens when the American Southwest runs out of water? (Esquire)

There is less of Lake Mead than there ever has been before, which is a problem because Lake Mead is the largest reservoir in the United States. Created by the construction of Hoover Dam, a big government project of the past, Lake Mead provides drinking water to four states, including California.


May 31, 2016--As one of its chief sources of water dries pp, California eases restrictions on use nonetheless (ProPublica)

Earlier this month, California lifted its sweeping restrictions on how its towns and cities use their water, signaling that even though much of the state continues to face extraordinary drought, a moderately wet winter has blunted officials’ sense of urgency over water shortages. Seemingly overlooked, however, is the state’s enormous reliance on the Colorado River for its urban


May 21, 2016--White House drought strategy will help Southwest (Pueblo Chieftain)

Drought has taken a record toll on the western United States. The 16-year drought we are experiencing (with no end in sight) affects millions of Americans and poses a serious threat to local communities. From farmers who need water to irrigate crops to families that rely on healthy waterways for jobs and recreation, to wildlife and ecosystems — nearly everyone and ev


May 19, 2016--‘Early warning signal’: Lake Mead hits historic low (Las Vegas Sun)

Lake Mead’s surface Wednesday evening hit its lowest level since the man-made reservoir was created by the building of the Hoover Dam in 1935. The surface of the lake — a critical source of water for Nevada, California, Arizona and Mexico — is expected to drop lower in the coming weeks, but rebound before the beginning of next year, when jurisdictions would be asked to ac


May 12, 2016--Sixteen years of drought in the Colorado River Basin: Reality or talking point? (Grand Junction Sentinel)

I was recently reading an article on the negotiations among the Lower Basin states concerning their use of Colorado River water when I came across this phrase: “after 16 years of drought.” It’s a phrase I’ve been seeing for many years now.


May 11, 2016--Nevada prepared for more Lake Mead cuts without ‘drastic steps’ (Las Vegas Sun)

Lake Mead is expected to surpass its historic low after next Wednesday. By the end of June, it is expected to have dropped to its lowest level since the man-made reservoir was created by the completion of the Hoover Dam in 1935.


May 2, 2016--As Lake Mead sinks, states agree to more drastic water cuts (High Country News)

Three years ago, state hydrologists in the Colorado River Basin began to do some modeling to see what the future of Lake Mead — the West’s largest reservoir — might look like.


CRRG Reports: Lake Mead Structural Deficit and a Call for Unified Management of Colorado River

A December 2015 report by the Colorado River Research Group (CRRG) calls for enacting strategies to deal with the structural deficit in Lake Mead. The lower basin reservoir of Lake Mead receives about 9 million acre-feet (AF) of water annually primarily the upper basin state’s Lake Powell. However, when evaporative losses are factored in, Lake Mead loses 10.2 million AF each year. This annual shortfall of 1.2 million AF of water has come to be known as the structural deficit. According to one of the report authors, Doug Kenney, while this is primarily a lower basin issue, the faster the structural deficit pulls down Lake Mead, more legal and political pressure will be on the upper basin states.


March 10, 2016--El Nino and the Colorado (Boulder Weekly)

Water levels and rainfall for the Colorado River basin were below-average in January and February, and will remain so until at least July 2016, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. The basin is at only 61 percent of its seasonal average. Likewise, inflow into Lake Powell and Lake Mead is also below the seasonal average.


Syndicate content