Lake Mead

July 19, 2014--Water rationing for farmers? It's on the horizon (Arizona Central)

Regional water planners last month made a prediction that will likely be a game-changer for Arizona's economy, revealing just how water scarcity will restructure the future of our food security. As early as 2017, drought in the Lower Colorado River's watershed could lead to irrigation rationing for central Arizona agriculture.


July 12, 2014--Lake Mead watch: At lowest levels since 1937 (High Country News)

For almost two decades, the white band of mineral deposits circling Arizona’s Lake Mead like a bathtub ring, has grown steadily taller, a sign that America’s largest manmade water source is in deep trouble. This week it fell to its lowest level since 1937, when Hoover Dam was completed and the reservoir filled.


July 8, 2014--Lake Mead edges closer to historic low level, raising river concerns (Rocky Mountain PBS)

Lake Mead. The white ring "around the tub" shows how much elevation the surface of the lake has lost. Lake Mead, the vast reservoir behind historic Hoover Dam outside Las Vegas, is flirting with historic low levels. And that doesn’t bode well for any of the seven states (or Mexico) that share Colorado River water.


July 6, 2014--Losing the race to stop Las Vegas from running totally dry (Independent)

As with many things in Sin City, the apparently endless supply of water is an illusion. America's most decadent destination has been engaged in a potentially catastrophic gamble with nature, and now, 14 years into a drought, it is on the verge of losing it all. The crisis stems from Vegas's reliance on Lake Mead, America's largest reservoir, created by the Hoover Dam in 1936.


July 6, 2014--Lake Mead drains to record low as Western drought deepens (Circle of Blue)

Lake Mead — America’s largest reservoir, Las Vegas’ main water source, and an important indicator for water supplies in the Southwest — will fall this week to its lowest level since 1937 when the manmade lake was first being filled, according to forecasts from the federal Bureau of Reclamation.


Hydropower Production Threatened

According to a February memorandum from the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB), both Lake Powell (of the Upper Colorado Basin) and Lake Mead (of the Lower Colorado Basin) could soon become too low to operate their hydropower plants if conditions don't improve. At the May 14th Southwest Basin Roundtable (SBR) meeting in Cortez, John McClow, Commissioner on the Upper Colorado River Commission, provided an overview of this developing situation on the Colorado River. Water shortages from a persistent drought in the Southwest have left both lakes dangerously low, threatening electric supplies that are relied on by 5.8 million customers.


June 29, 2014--River series: The state of the river (Post Independent)

Metaphorically speaking, just because Southern California is in the shower with shampoo in its hair, does not mean it gets to take all the water. Lake Powell is being drained to fill Lake Mead, which is being drained by states downstream from it.


June 25, 2014--Part of Colorado River declared National Water Trail (Las Vegas Review Journal)

A stretch of the Colorado River through the nation’s driest state has been named a National Water Trail by Interior Secretary Sally Jewell. The Black Canyon Water Trail, as it is now known, takes in a 30-mile stretch of the Colorado from the downstream side of Hoover Dam to the mouth of Eldorado Canyon, south of Boulder City.


June 20, 2014--Water war bubbling up between California and Arizona (Los Angeles Times)

Once upon a time, California and Arizona went to war over water. The year was 1934, and Arizona was convinced that the construction of Parker Dam on the lower Colorado River was merely a plot to enable California to steal its water rights.


June 18, 2014--Draining water from SW cities (Outside Online)

Rising temperatures induced by global warming are enhancing a 14-year drought in the Western United States—the worst seen in the region in about 1,250 years. The region's dam system and the 30 million people dependent upon it are paying the price.


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