Irrigation

Water Use Audits Offered to Farmers!

Farmers consume nearly 90 percent of Colorado's water, and Colorado State University is offering ways for them to use it more efficiently. A grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture to CSU's Center for Agricultural Energy will pay for reduced-cost irrigation efficiency audits for growers with center pivot systems.


August 17, 2014--West’s historic drought stokes fears of water crisis (Washington Post)

When the winter rains failed to arrive in this Sacramento Valley town for the third straight year, farmers tightened their belts and looked to the reservoirs in the nearby hills to keep them in water through the growing season.


August 17, 2014--Conservation measures take center stage (Post Independent)

Gary Bumgarner doesn’t like to hear statistics that say irrigated agriculture makes up 85 percent of Colorado’s consumptive water use. It’s misleading, he says, and as a fourth-generation Grand County rancher with senior and junior water rights, he knows a thing or two about water.


August 14, 2014--'Game-changing' initiative could drastically cut water usage for farming (UALR Radio)

Delta Plastics has launched a new water conservation software initiative that leaders say could reduce water usage by 20 percent by the year 2020. "This initiative is the most important conservation effort we have ever launched," said Dhu Thompson, Delta Plastics Chairman. "‘Preserving our farmland’ has been our company slogan for nearly 20 years.


August 7, 2014--California century-old water rights profit from drought (Bloomberg)

Last summer, in the second year of California’s latest dry spell, Michael Perez, a farmer in the state’s Central Valley, paid $250 an acre-foot for water to irrigate his almonds, cherries, tomatoes, and cotton.


July 28, 2014--Water table depth can affect crops (AGWeek)

Shallow water tables can impact crop production, according to Daniel Ostrem, South Dakota State University Extension water resource field specialist. “The water level underground can greatly benefit the crop or hinder its growth, depending on where it is located in respect to the plant’s roots,” Ostrem says.


July 26, 2014--Aquifer's decline threatens economy (Salina Journal)

As a boy in the late 1940s, Gary Baker occasionally rolled out of bed at 3 a.m. to help his father harness a head of water meandering down the Great Eastern Ditch. The supply was diverted from the Arkansas River and collected in Lake McKinney, then released to feed a ditch system capable of flood-irrigating crops.


July 25, 2014--The Colorado River Basin can’t afford to leave farmers out to dry (Environmental Defense Fund)

On Colorado River Day, it’s worth considering how we can write the next chapter in the water story of the American West. With the recent news that Lake Mead is at its lowest level in history, it’s impossible to ignore the trajectory of America’s hardest-working river.


July 22, 2014--Drier than the Dust Bowl: Waiting for relief in rural America (Washington Post)

As rural America wilts, this is how those left working its powder-dry land get by: At the appointed hour, Chuck turns the head gate at the Fort Lyon Canal, sending water sluicing through ditches bordering the fields. He tracks up and down the rows, adjusting pipes and valves to make sure the water is flowing just right.


July 19, 2014--Drought pushing water prices to record levels (Times Herald)

Rumors drifted across the parched Central Valley that a bidding war for water might push auction prices as high as $3,000 an acre-foot, up from $60 in a normal year. Yet, Ray Flanders needed water to keep his orchards alive.


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