In The News

July 27, 2016--The Colorado River’s unexpected carbon footprint (High Country News)

When water rushed over the dry riverbed of the Colorado River Delta for the first time in two decades, thousands of bubbles popped up in the sand. Alongside the bank, a group of scientists stood in awe, theorizing that oxygen and nitrogentrapped in the sediment were the cause.


July 26, 2016--Wildlife officials to poison invasive fish in East Fork of Hermosa Creek (Durango Herald)

Next week, Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials will be treating a two-mile section of the East Fork of Hermosa Creek as part of ongoing efforts to eliminate invasive fish species and restore native Colorado River cutthroat trout to the watershed. The section, which stretches from below Sig Creek Falls to just above the confluence on the main stem, will be treated with an organic p


July 25, 2016--Snow, runoff and the Colorado River Basin (Mountain Town News)

From his office in Glenwood Springs overlooking the Colorado River, Eric Kuhn has become one of the West’s most prominent thinkers about the intersection of water, climate change, and allocations for farms, factories and cities, including ski towns. He joined the Colorado River Water Conservation District as an engineer after working in the private sector as a nuclear engin


July 23, 2016--Year Round Gardening: Rain barrels soon legal in Colorado (Gazette)

With the approach of legal use of rainwater collection on August 10th, Colorado residents are asking a lot of questions. Before you try reading the actual legislation, we’ll cover some of the basics. New laws allow for the collection and storage of rainwater for use on the property from which it is collected.