In The News

October 12, 2014--U.S. Bureau of Reclamation - Basin municipalities and federal government take action to protect the Colorado River (YNN)

 Faced with the increasing probability of shortage on the Colorado River, municipal water providers in Arizona, California, Nevada and Colorado, and the Bureau of Reclamation are implementing a landmark Colorado River System Conservation program. Reclamation is soliciting water conservation project proposals from Colorado River entitlement holders in Arizona, California, and Nevada.


October 12, 2014--Drought making Calif. more like Arizona (Arizona Central)

For many years, California has stared at the prospect of long-running drought and effectively sniffed with contempt. In the minds of many urban Californians, drought may be a burden and an annoyance, but hardly a threat to the coastal lifestyle. Yes, the consequences of long-term drought, like urban brushfires and a decimated Central Valley farm industry, may be a concern.


October 11, 2014--Navajo residents have running water for first time (News 13)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture says some Navajo families in New Mexico now have running water for the first time. USDA Rural Development officials held a dedication ceremony Friday for a new water system in Mariano Lake on the Navajo Nation. A USDA grant of $1 million funded the first phase of the water system’s construction.


October 11, 2014--No easier answers for water supply, growth (Pueblo Chieftain)

It’s probably wise to expect a little pain when you grab the bull by the horns.So, the Arkansas Basin Roundtable this week wrestled the question of new development, land use policies and local control to the ground, only to find that it jumped back up to torment.


October 11, 2014--Western Colorado’s water safe for now (Post Independent)

Perry Cabot, a Grand Junction resident, is a doctor of agricultural engineering and land resources. While currently employed by Colorado State University’s extension office in Grand Junction, he’s working hard to gain insight into one of Colorado’s biggest issues — water and its impacts on agriculture.