In The News

October 2, 2014--Climate change could increase global fresh water: MIT (Climate Central)

Water stress — the general scarcity of freshwater for people who need it — is considered by many scientists as one of the biggest challenges facing humanity and struggling ecosystems in a world increasingly affected by climate change. Studies differ on how much the world’s growing population will be affected by the growing diff


October 2, 2014--Colorado’s river economy worth $9 billion (High Country News)

As Colorado prepares its first statewide water plan, which will determine how water is managed water across the state now and for decades to come, a crucial debate is taking place: how to divvy up Colorado’s dwindling water supplies.


October 2, 2014--Good intentions gone awry on the Colorado River (Mountain Town News)

For Brad Udall, family history and public policy in the Colorado River mingle. His father was Morris K. Udall, a congressman from Arizona who pushed hard for the Central Arizona Project, which was approved by Congress in 1968. His uncle Stewart Udall, a former Arizona congressman, was secretary of Interior when CAP was approved.


October 1, 2014--Preventing water wars: How to build bridges over river disputes (The Guardian)

Fifty years ago, Lake Chad in Africa had a surface area of 25,000 square kilometres. Today, it has less than 2,000. The surface area of the Aral Sea in central Asia has dropped by half, from 66,000 to 33,000 square km, and the Dead Sea in the Middle East from almost 1,000 to 650 square km. Fifty years from now, Lake Chad is at risk of disappearing altogether.


October 1, 2014--Lower IQ in children linked to chemical in water (Scientific American)

Babies born to mothers with high levels of perchlorate during their first trimester are more likely to have lower IQs later in life, according to a new study. The research is the first to link pregnant women's perchlorate levels to their babies’ brain development.