Hydropower

Two West Slope Water Conservation Districts Jointly Adopt Principles for Addressing Colorado River Drought Conditions

The two Water Conservation Districts that comprise the entire Colorado River basin in Colorado adopted implementation principles concerning how the current, extended drought conditions are addressed on the Colorado River’s storage system.

December 10, 2014--Lake Powell’s low water level plays into water supply (Cortez Journal)

Colorado water managers are keeping a close eye on the historically low reservoir levels at Lake Powell. Under the Colorado River Compact, the major river is divided between upper basin states and lower basin states.


December 2, 2014--Hoover Dam low water to double water costs to SoCal (Cal Watchdog.com)

California is facing yet another drought-caused water and energy shortage from an unexpected source. Hoover Dam’s hydroelectric power may have to be curtailed if the water level drops below 1,000 feet, an elevation it last reached in May 1936, when the reservoir was still being filled.


November 22, 2014--Panel recommends $650 million Lake Mead project, rate hike (Las Vegas Journal)

A community advisory committee is recommending a new $650 million water project — and a rate hike to pay for it — to secure the Las Vegas Valley’s water supply even under a worst case scenario at Lake Mead.


November 11, 2014--Factory and irrigation technologies have significantly cut US water use (Popular Science)

In 2010, the U.S. used less water than it has in a generation, according to a new announcement from the U.S. Geological Survey. American power plants, factories, farms, and homes used a total of 355 billion gallons of fresh and salt water a day in 2010. If you divide that amount by the U.S. population in 2010, it comes out to 1,150 gallons per person, per day.


October 30, 2014--Hydropower may be huge source of methane emissions (Climate Central)

Imagine nearly 6,000 dairy cows doing what cows do, belching and being flatulent for a full year. That’s how much methane was emitted from one Ohio reservoir in 2012. Reservoirs and hydropower are often thought of as climate friendly because they don’t burn fossil fuels to produce electricity.


September 10, 2014--How 'clean power' dams actually damage the environment (Public Radio International)

“Hydropower is really not a renewable resource in the most strict sense of the term,” explains Jason Rainey, the executive director of International Rivers.


August 13, 2014--Dire water predicament spurs cooperation, compromise (Grand Junction Free Press)

After a winter of happy news about the generous snowpack in Colorado’s mountains, summer brought reminders that our regional water situation is dire – or, at least, poised on the edge of direness. Just as the ink was drying on mid-July headlines announcing that Lake Mead had dropped t


August 11, 2014--Bone on bone in the Colorado River: Energy in times of drought (Denver Post)

Colorado water leaders used a curious approach last week in announcing a new water conservation program involving the Colorado River. They talked about electricity and the effect of spiking prices on corn farmers in eastern Colorado, ski area operators on the Western Slope, and cities along the Front Range. The scenario?


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