Growth

Water-Energy Nexus

The interdependencies between water and energy, the water-energy nexus, is becoming more prominent. Water is used in all phases of energy production and energy is required to extract, convey, and deliver water. Yet, several trends are adding stress to the water-energy nexus, namely climate change and population growth. According to the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Water-Energy Nexus: Challenges and Opportunities report, power generation and agriculture-related are the largest users of water in the U.S. However, water withdrawals have been steadily decreasing due to a number of factors, predominantly reduced supplies, while growth in the two fore-mentioned sectors have been steadily increasing.


Colorado Water Plan and Growth

In an effort to better prepare for an estimated doubling of its population by the year 2050, from approximately 5 million people to an estimated 10.5 million, Colorado released their first Statewide Water Plan last November.


March 11, 2016--Despite state water plan, local headwaters have growing claims (Summit Daily)

The battle over water is moving to a boil. Colorado unveiled a statewide water plan this past November to better prepare for an estimated doubling of its population by the year 2050, from about 5 million to an estimated 10.5 million.


March 4, 2016--Future of the Colorado River Basin (Arizona State University)

The Colorado River provides water for nearly 40 million people in seven western states, irrigating millions of acres of farmland, and generating thousands of megawatts of electricity. And though an official declaration of water shortage on the Colorado River has never been declared, and that careful planning has ensured Arizona and Colorado are well-supplied with water, residents need to k


February 16, 2016--Water managers want to talk about basin diversions (Aspen Daily News)

Two members of a committee dedicated to the “equitable division of the state’s waters” from the Arkansas basin want to talk about moving more water from Western Slope rivers to thirsty towns and farms east of the Continental Divide. “I think the discussion needs to be pushed,” said Jeris Danielson, who is director of the Purgatoire River Water Conservancy Dist


February 8, 2016--8 trends and takeaways from this year’s Water Congress (Denver Water)

all me a water nerd, but I love going to the Colorado Water Congress annual convention every year. But it can be exhausting. Three days of networking and catching up with professional colleagues (and friends) can wear a girl down, but it’s totally worth it. The convention is devoted to education and conversation on all things water.


February 3, 2016--PRID shareholders hear about State Water Plan (Pine River Times)

The final Colorado Water Plan released in November 2015 is "a significant improvement" over the first draft released in December 2014, water engineer Steve Harris told Pine River Irrigation District shareholders at the Jan.


February 1, 2016--More federal resources needed to fight drought in the West (Las Vegas Sun)

The annual Colorado College Conservation in the West Poll results released in January, surveying attitudes of voters in seven Western states on conservation, environment and energy issues, shows just how much Westerners, most particularly Western Hispanics, are concerned about the ongoing drought. A significant majority of Hispanics polled considered water issues — low levels of wate


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