Growth

April 19, 2014--Let economic sense flow as part of Colorado’s water plan (Denver Business Journal)

Healthy rivers are essential to Colorado’s multibillion-dollar agriculture, recreational, tourism and business economies, not to mention the Colorado River’s impact on the 36 million people who rely on it for drinking water. Yet, for more than a decade Colorado and surrounding states have experienced unrelenting drought.


April 16, 2014--Jolted by reality, Colorado River water managers plan for persistent drought (Circle of Blue)

The severe risks of an extended drought in the Colorado River Basin – a shutdown of hydropower generation, functionally empty lakes, and restrictions on water use – are forcing the basin’s seven states to consider unprecedented changes in how they manage a scarce resource.


April 16, 2014--Drought regions show high levels of “water stress” (US News and World Report)

California’s drought has become the state’s worst on record, draining reservoirs and destroying crops. Yet it’s far from unique. Severely dry conditions are now afflicting about two-thirds of Texas, and droughts also are being felt in parts of Oklahoma, Minnesota and Colorado.

April 15, 2014--Water expert Mulroy to join Brookings Mountain West, Desert Research Institute (Las Vegas Sun)

Recently retired water czar Pat Mulroy is bringing her expertise and reputation as an international leader on water issues to a pair of institutions with a connection to UNLV, the Sun has learned. Mulroy will take on dual roles with Brookings Mountain West and the Desert Research Institute.


April 11, 2014--Water supply concerns dominate regional seminar (Pine River Times)

With continuing population growth in Southwestern states and ongoing drought, water issues are becoming more and more about who has to cut back their use when there isn't enough to meet demand. That thread ran through presentations at the annual Water Seminar on April 4 in Durango, sponsored by the Southwest Water Conservation District.


April 10, 2014--Udall introduces water efficiency bills (Albuquerque Business First)

Sen. Tom Udall (D-NM) has introduced four bills intended to improve the use of water in New Mexico and other Western states. The bills are based on recommendations made during a Water Conference Udall co-hosted with New Mexico State University in 2012. “Water is crucial to our economy and to our quality of life. Our future depends on it.


April 10, 2014--Determining the sustainability of water, agriculture in Arizona (ASU News)

Central Arizona has a rich history of agriculture, contributing $9.2 billion toward the state’s economy. That water has near-absolute power in determining the region’s fate is not an over-reaching assumption. With increasing urban development and an uncertain climate, is this industry doomed or can it be sustained?


March 30, 2014--IPCC report: ‘Climate change is happening and no one in the world is immune’ (Post Independent)

From food shortages to loss of species, the latest IPCC report paints a bleak picture for the planet. The negative effects of climate change are already beginning to be felt in every part of the world and yet countries are ill-prepared for the potentially immense impacts on food security, water supplies and human health, a major report has concluded.


March 30, 2014--On oil-water nexus (Arab News)

In addition to the conventional energy market issues, mainly oil, related to price and production, the industry seems to be gearing for a new worry — how to handle the oil-water nexus. A recent UN Water Day has a very simple message to deliver: Water needs energy and energy needs water. The interdependencies between the two is strengthened and consolidated by the day.


March 30, 2014--Despite good snowpack in Rockies, Lake Mead level still expected to drop (Las Vegas Sun)

Lake Mead is drying up. At the rate we use water in the valley, the reservoir — the largest in the country — could be drained and arid by 2050. Thirty years ago, a seemingly endless supply of water rushed down the Colorado River, into Lake Mead and out of our faucets. Today, 14 years into a drought that has left the valley parched, our reservoirs are less than half full. Why?


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