Growth

September 1, 2014--Water: Battleground of the West (Durango Herald)

west of the invisible 100th meridian line separating the East from the West, Harold Baxstrom irrigates 180 acres of hay or pasture with water directly from Lemon Reservoir.


August 31, 2014--Reducing water scarcity possible by 2050 (Phys.org)

Water scarcity is not a problem just for the developing world. In California, legislators are currently proposing a $7.5 billion emergency water plan to their voters; and U.S. federal officials last year warned residents of Arizona and Nevada that they could face cuts in Colorado River water deliveries in 2016.


August 29, 2014--Water 'thermostat' could help engineer drought-resistant crops (Science Daily)

Duke University researchers have identified a gene that could help scientists engineer drought-resistant crops. The gene, called OSCA1, encodes a protein in the cell membrane of plants that senses changes in water availability and adjusts the plant's water conservation machinery accordingly.


August 26, 2014--In Colorado, conversation about lawn water use begins (KUNC)

As Colorado plans for a future with more people and less water, some in the world of water are turning to the problem of lawns. In the 2014 legislative session, state senator Ellen Roberts (R-Durango) introduced a bill that would limit lawns in new developments if they took water from farms.


August 22, 2014--Governor thinks new major dam project ‘unlikely’ (Aspen Times)

Gov. John Hickenlooper told members of the Colorado Water Congress on Thursday that he thinks it’s “unlikely” that public opinion in the state has shifted in favor of a new major dam project being built in the state, even in the face of population growth and drought.


August 21, 2014--Sen. Udall speaks on water conservation in Snowmass (Aspen Times)

Climate change is globally impacting natural resources, particularly water supplies, and that can’t go unchecked, U.S. Sen. Mark Udall said Wednesday in Snowmass Village.


August 18, 2014--Only bold action will save the Colorado River (Arizona Central)

Reservoirs once filled to the brim from the Colorado and its tributaries are at historic lows due to an unprecedented drought and growing human demands. Shrunken stream flows now pose serious challenges for wildlife and recreation, as well as cities, farms and others who rely upon the river.


August 16, 2014--The West gets thirstier as water supplies dwindle (Post Independent)

The soothing sound of the Colorado River as it meanders its way across Colorado’s Western Slope is the sound of a thriving economy, a fragile environment and an impending crisis. The state of water supplies in the arid West is volatile, and forecasts are grim.


August 5, 2014--Front Range eyes more Colorado River diversions (Sky-Hi News)

The nascent Colorado Water Plan has begun to materialize in the form of draft implementation plans for each of the state’s eight largest river basins. And Front Range interests are once again looking toward the Colorado River to cushion water demand in the face of rising populations and interstate water obligations on the other side of the divide.


August 4, 2014--The west's drought goes underground (Bloomberg View)

Seven Western states have just received an overdraft notice from nature's water bank, written in red ink, all caps. It turns out that three-fourths of the H2O they've been using during the American West's record drought (14 years and counting) has been drawn from their precious savings account: not the Colorado River itself but aquifers below ground.


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