Growth

August 19, 2016--Rio water pollution reflects global crisis (Guardian)

The heavily contaminated waters of Rio don’t only put at risk the health of Olympians (Report, 3 August), they adversely affect the millions of people facing this faecal nightmare day in and day out. Despite Brazil being an upper-middle income country,


August 4, 2016--As thirsty cities drive up water's price, can farms survive on the Front Range? (KUNC)

Few things are more valuable to a farmer in the arid West than irrigation water. Without it, the land turns back into its natural state: dry, dusty plains. If a fast-growing city is your neighbor, then your water holds even more value. Farm families in Western states like California and Colorado are increasingly under pressure to sell their water.


July 31, 2016--Killing the Colorado: Documentary addresses river water (Hava Sun News)

The Colorado River never captured the American imagination like its sister, the mighty Mississippi. While the Mississippi brings to mind images of steamboats, rustic charm and Mark Twain, the Colorado is all business. The Colorado River isn’t romanticized, but it is vital to the West – and according to a new Discovery Channel documentary, it is dying.


July 29, 2016--Where are the world’s most water-stressed cities? (Guardian)

Water stress – where the human or ecological demand for water is not met – is caused by a variety of factors.


July 29, 2016--Denver Water CEO calls for more flexibility in water management (Aspen Daily News)

Jim Lochhead, the CEO and manager of Denver Water, said Tuesday that building new dams in the Colorado River basin is not at the top of his to-do list. Nor, for that matter, is drying up farms to provide water for Colorado’s growing cities. But he says Colorado still needs to have hard conversations about how to flexibly manage its water.


July 22, 2016--Water is the new gold (Grand Junction Sentinel)

A Denver newspaper earlier this week highlighted the apparently shocking new discovery by some investors that in Colorado, “water is the new gold.” As the article explained, water rights may be as valuable to modern developers and town builders as the mother lode was during the gold rush that settled Colorado. This latest story involves the pending sale of an old family farm in


May 19, 2016--‘Early warning signal’: Lake Mead hits historic low (Las Vegas Sun)

Lake Mead’s surface Wednesday evening hit its lowest level since the man-made reservoir was created by the building of the Hoover Dam in 1935. The surface of the lake — a critical source of water for Nevada, California, Arizona and Mexico — is expected to drop lower in the coming weeks, but rebound before the beginning of next year, when jurisdictions would be asked to ac


Water-Energy Nexus

The interdependencies between water and energy, the water-energy nexus, is becoming more prominent. Water is used in all phases of energy production and energy is required to extract, convey, and deliver water. Yet, several trends are adding stress to the water-energy nexus, namely climate change and population growth. According to the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Water-Energy Nexus: Challenges and Opportunities report, power generation and agriculture-related are the largest users of water in the U.S. However, water withdrawals have been steadily decreasing due to a number of factors, predominantly reduced supplies, while growth in the two fore-mentioned sectors have been steadily increasing.


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