Drought

July 16, 2014--Grasshopper plagues: agricultural nightmare or ecological boon? (High Country News)

In early June, meteorologists at the National Weather Service in Albuquerque, New Mexico, were puzzled: There was a big splotch on the radar that didn’t look like any weather system they’d ever seen. Maybe their software had a bug? Turns out, the dark green blob hovering over Albuquerque wasn’t a software glitch at all but a giant swarm of grasshoppers.


July 15, 2014--California drought threatens to dry up farm wells (Washington Post)

Researchers say farmers in pockets of California hardest hit by the drought could begin to see wells run dry next year. The Center for Watershed Sciences at the University of California, Davis, released the study Tuesday on the possible impact if the next two years remain dry in California.


July 15, 2014--Drought conditions linked to human activity (Environmental News Network)

US Government scientists have developed a new high-resolution climate model that shows southwestern Australia's long-term decline in fall and winter rainfall is caused by increases in manmade greenhouse gas emissions and ozone depletion.


July 14, 2014--Deer declining across Colorado and West (Denver Post)

Bouncy, big-eared icons of the American West, deer are declining rapidly across Colorado and other states — forcing difficult decisions. The causes vary from energy development to hard winters and aren't always clear. But dwindling numbers already have driven cutbacks on deer hunting, reducing potential funds for land conservation.


July 14, 2014--The past and future of California's water (Scientific American)

The 20th century dawned with both excitement and concern for the water future of California and the rapidly growing but arid American West. Gold fever was receding, urban populations were burgeoning, and tentative efforts at modern, irrigated agriculture were expanding.


July 13, 2014--Another view: Busting water conservation myths (Sacramento Bee)

As a solution for California’s complex water challenges, conserving water to get more from every drop stands out for its great potential and the misconceptions around it.


July 12, 2014--Lake Mead watch: At lowest levels since 1937 (High Country News)

For almost two decades, the white band of mineral deposits circling Arizona’s Lake Mead like a bathtub ring, has grown steadily taller, a sign that America’s largest manmade water source is in deep trouble. This week it fell to its lowest level since 1937, when Hoover Dam was completed and the reservoir filled.


July 8, 2014--Lake Mead edges closer to historic low level, raising river concerns (Rocky Mountain PBS)

Lake Mead. The white ring "around the tub" shows how much elevation the surface of the lake has lost. Lake Mead, the vast reservoir behind historic Hoover Dam outside Las Vegas, is flirting with historic low levels. And that doesn’t bode well for any of the seven states (or Mexico) that share Colorado River water.


July 6, 2014--Water transfers: Wrong and wasteful? (Appeal Democrat)

Year after year, Sacramento Valley groundwater is pumped out to replace surface water being sent south. It's been called an amoral practice and an unnecessary strain on a resource that is being depleted. It's said the impacts are being swept under the rug so big business agriculture in the south can stay afloat during the drought.


July 6, 2014--Losing the race to stop Las Vegas from running totally dry (Independent)

As with many things in Sin City, the apparently endless supply of water is an illusion. America's most decadent destination has been engaged in a potentially catastrophic gamble with nature, and now, 14 years into a drought, it is on the verge of losing it all. The crisis stems from Vegas's reliance on Lake Mead, America's largest reservoir, created by the Hoover Dam in 1936.


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