Drought

July 22, 2015--California’s big groundwater problem (New York Times)

California struggles to measure how much water its heaviest users draw from its rivers and streams.


July 22, 2015--El Niño ends La Plata's dry run (Mancos Times)

Above-average spring and summer rains have helped break a 3½-year drought in La Plata County. Higher-than-average precipitation in the region could continue into the winter if El Niño patterns persist, said Jim Pringle, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Grand Junction. "It looks highly likely La Plata County should stay out of any drought cla


July 20, 2015--2nd version of water plan to set key principles (Grand Junction Sentinel)

The second version of the Colorado Water Plan offers some assurance to the Western Slope about the process for deciding how the state will deal with water issues, but it still leaves the Western Slope open to pressure from the east and west, water officials said. The second version of the plan unveiled this month also earned plaudits from environmental organizations for its emphasis on con


July 18, 2015--The California drought is just the beginning of our national water emergency (Nation)

The United Nations reports that we have 15 years to avert a full-blown water crisis and that, by 2030, demand for water will outstrip supply by 40 percent.


July 17, 2015--How the West overcounts its water supplies (New York Times)

Paul Matuska is the closest thing the American West has to a water cop, and his beat includes Needles, Calif., a beleaguered desert town midway between Flagstaff, Ariz., and Los Angeles. About 4,800 people live in Needles, on the western bank of the Colorado River where it cuts a swath in the mud between California and Arizona.


July 16, 2015--Colorado virtually drought-free after several thirsty years, report shows (Denver Post)

A federal drought report released Thursday shows Colorado is nearly free of the thirst that has affected the state — particularly the Western Slope and southeastern counties — for years. Only about 2 percent of the state, limited to the extreme northwest and southwest corners, is still under a designation of "abnormally dry." Last week, 25 percent of Colorad


July 15, 2015--Is water on the way to becoming 'clear gold' in California? (Los Angeles Times)

Water may soon become more valuable than oil. That's the punch line of today's cartoon, which responds to the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's proposal to raise revenue, to fix its crumbling infrastructure and encourage conservation during the ongoing California drought.


July 13, 2015--When a tree falls in the forest, what’s the impact on water resources? (phys.org)

Forest management practices such as cutting or thinning trees reduce the risk of wildfires, and enhance the overall health of the woodlands. However, they also can speed up the pace of snow melt, which in turn may increase erosion and destabilize streams.


July 10, 2015--It's about to get easier for California farmers to conserve water—and sell it (CityLab)

There’s no “solving” California’s drought, as so many headlines suggest. Drought is a regular feature of the Western climate cycle.


July 7, 2015--Drought sheds new light on WWII wreckage in Lake Mead (KJZZ)

July 1948, a B-29 Superfortress zips over the remote waters of Lake Mead. It’s a secret test mission for a missile guidance system. Except there's a problem: the pilots misjudge the attitude. The massive bomber plunges into the lake. The crew survives, but the plane is lost.


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