Drought

Colorado Weather Program Seeks Volunteers to Monitor Drought, Climate

Weather watchers are needed to help Colorado State monitor the ongoing drought and longer-term climate conditions. The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, known as CoCoRaHS, is hoping to have at least one person per square mile recording observations along the Front Range, and as many as possible elsewhere in the state.


July 25, 2014--The Colorado River Basin can’t afford to leave farmers out to dry (Environmental Defense Fund)

On Colorado River Day, it’s worth considering how we can write the next chapter in the water story of the American West. With the recent news that Lake Mead is at its lowest level in history, it’s impossible to ignore the trajectory of America’s hardest-working river.

July 25, 2014 -- Groundwater levels drop in Southwestern U.S. in ongoing drought (Reuters)

Underground stores of water in the southwestern United States have receded dramatically amid ongoing drought that has parched states from Oklahoma to the Pacific Coast and is costing California billions in lost crops and jobs, a new study shows.

July 23, 2014--How droughts are like recessions (Washington Post)

Everybody knows what drought is, right? It’s when lawns start to brown, creeks dry up, and you get a water conservation notice from the local utility. For the Colorado farmers in Lydia DePillis’s story, drought is a threat to their livelihoods — and getting their counties recognized as drought disaster zones means access to emergency loans and grants.


July 22, 2014--Drier than the Dust Bowl: Waiting for relief in rural America (Washington Post)

As rural America wilts, this is how those left working its powder-dry land get by: At the appointed hour, Chuck turns the head gate at the Fort Lyon Canal, sending water sluicing through ditches bordering the fields. He tracks up and down the rows, adjusting pipes and valves to make sure the water is flowing just right.


July 19, 2014--Drought pushing water prices to record levels (Times Herald)

Rumors drifted across the parched Central Valley that a bidding war for water might push auction prices as high as $3,000 an acre-foot, up from $60 in a normal year. Yet, Ray Flanders needed water to keep his orchards alive.


July 18, 2014--Drought is catalyst to reforming how we deliver water to Americans (Denver Business Journal)

For many people, news coverage of drought, low water tables, and increased pumping of aquifers are just words. The average American lacks full understanding of how the drought in the Western states affects them and the businesses they patronize.


July 18, 2014--New report recommends effective water solutions in CO River Basin (Water World)

American Rivers and Western Resource Advocates -- two authorities on Western water issues -- issued a new report that identifies conservation, reuse and other innovative solutions that could eliminate Western water shortages stemming from the over-stressed Colorado River.


July 16, 2014--State officials push for water conservation as climate change threatens (International Business Times)

California regulators are expected to pass the first-ever emergency water restrictions for the entire state. The rules, if passed, will levy fines of up to $500 a day on Californians who over-water their yards or hose down sidewalks and driveways. Scientists aren’t certain whether the now three-year-long drought is a direct result of climate change.


July 16, 2014--California agriculture industry facing $1 billion in drought losses (Los Angeles Times)

California’s agricultural industry is facing $1 billion in lost revenue this year from the state’s worst drought in decades and could pay about $500 million for additional groundwater pumping, a new study said.


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