Drought

Colorado Weather Program Seeks Volunteers to Monitor Drought, Climate

Weather watchers are needed to help Colorado State monitor the ongoing drought and longer-term climate conditions. The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, known as CoCoRaHS, is hoping to have at least one person per square mile recording observations along the Front Range, and as many as possible elsewhere in the state.


September 19, 2016--Think California’s current drought is bad? Past incarnations have lasted hundreds of years (Washington Post)

California is now five years deep into one of its most severe droughts on record, and scientists are continually probing the different factors that affect the state’s climate, and how much those are related to the overall warming of the globe.


September 17, 2016--Colorado River faces flood of challenges (Post Independent)

The common denominator among speakers at the Colorado River District’s annual seminar Friday was that stakeholders have an uphill battle to protect the river.


September 16, 2016--For the first time, U.S. and Mexico take stock of the underground water they share (High Country News)

An unknown number of aquifers dot the border along the U.S. and Mexico, groundwater both sides use for agriculture, irrigation, and cities. Likewise, how much border communities rely on them and the ways they are managed by either country remain largely unclear. For a decade, researchers have attempted to study these transboundary aquifers, but limited funding from the U.S.


September 10, 2016--New Mexico water officials eye pipeline to Colorado lake (Farmington Times)

A water commission is eyeing a possible pipeline from a Colorado lake to northern New Mexico. The Daily Times reports San Juan Water Commission members will meet in October to weigh having the pipeline designed at an estimated cost of $10,000 to $15,000. Further study could cost up to $250,000. Lake Nighthorse in southern Colorado is managed by the Bureau of Reclamation. The


September 7, 2016--The forecast for Lake Mead: Hot and dry with plenty of anxiety (Los Angeles Times)

A reckoning arrives every August for the Colorado River and the 40 million people across the West who depend on it. After water managers measure annual inflows and outflows and do their best to estimate future precipitation in places as far-flung as northwestern Wyoming and southwestern New Mexico, they make a pronouncement that once was arcane but has become increasingly prominent —


August 26, 2016--Climate change and flood in Baton Rouge (Democracy Now)

The floodwaters are receding in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and the scale of the damage is revealing itself. It has been described as a 1,000-year flood, leaving at least 13 people dead and close to 60,000 homes ruined. According to Weather Underground meteorologists Jeff Masters and Bob Henson, August has been the wettest month in Baton Rouge in 174 years, when records were first kept.


August 14, 2016--Study: Drought like 2000-2006 would empty Lake Powell (Aspen Daily News)

From his office along the Colorado River in Glenwood Springs, Eric Kuhn can see the bottom of Lake Powell. Kuhn, the general manager of the Colorado River District, has been working for months on a study asking if future droughts will drop water levels in Lake Powell so low that Glen Canyon Dam won’t be able to produce hydropower or release enough water to meet downstream demands.&nb


July 31, 2016--Killing the Colorado: Documentary addresses river water (Hava Sun News)

The Colorado River never captured the American imagination like its sister, the mighty Mississippi. While the Mississippi brings to mind images of steamboats, rustic charm and Mark Twain, the Colorado is all business. The Colorado River isn’t romanticized, but it is vital to the West – and according to a new Discovery Channel documentary, it is dying.


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