Drought

Colorado Weather Program Seeks Volunteers to Monitor Drought, Climate

Weather watchers are needed to help Colorado State monitor the ongoing drought and longer-term climate conditions. The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, known as CoCoRaHS, is hoping to have at least one person per square mile recording observations along the Front Range, and as many as possible elsewhere in the state.


October 1, 2014--Preventing water wars: How to build bridges over river disputes (The Guardian)

Fifty years ago, Lake Chad in Africa had a surface area of 25,000 square kilometres. Today, it has less than 2,000. The surface area of the Aral Sea in central Asia has dropped by half, from 66,000 to 33,000 square km, and the Dead Sea in the Middle East from almost 1,000 to 650 square km.


October 1, 2014--$215M project to fight drought problems (Colorado County Citizens)

The Lower Colorado River Authority board of directors approved the construction of the first major reservoir on the Colorado River since the 1940s, on Sept. 17. LCRA directors unanimously approved a 40,000 acre-foot off-channel reservoir near Lane City in Wharton County.


September 29, 2014--Predicting the worldwide impact of water scarcity on the energy sector (Water Online)

Most of the effects of drought around the world are obvious — dried up lakes, water restrictions, brown lawns, destroyed crops, and wildfires. But there is another consequence of water scarcity that is often not considered — and it can result in a literally powerless nation. Water is vital for nearly every type of energy generation.


September 29, 2014--New report highlights USA's water-supply woes (USA Today)

A report, released Monday by the Johnson Foundation at Wingspread, found that "diminished water supply is the greatest threat to the economic security and social stability of major portions of this country." "We all need water and count on it to survive," said Lynn Broaddus, director of the environment program at the foundation.


September 22, 2014--In California, less water means more West Nile virus (KPCC)

West Nile virus is spread by mosquitoes. They contract the virus when they feed on infected birds, then spread it to the birds they bite next. A shortage of water can accelerate this cycle.


September 22, 2014--Mt. Shasta mudslide blamed on drought, melting glacier (Los Angeles Times)

California's prolonged drought is believed to have caused a massive mudslide on Mt. Shasta over the weekend after meltwater from a glacier sent torrents of debris and mud down the mountain, officials said.


September 19, 2014--Western U.S. governors begin drought discussions (Circle of Blue)

In the midst of a record-smashing dry cycle in the United States, the organization with the most influence over state and federal drought policy wants to do a better job managing the crisis. The need is evident. New research indicates that current state drought plans are inadequate for the task.


September 19, 2014--How the hot and dry West is killing Rocky Mountain forests (High Country News)

Severe fires, unprecedented bark beetle infestations, heat and drought – all exacerbated by climate change – are killing trees throughout the Rocky Mountains. So whether you’re a fan of New Mexico’s piñon pines, Colorado’s aspens or Montana’s whitebark pines, the West’s forests could look radically different in 50 to 100 years.


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