Drought

Colorado Weather Program Seeks Volunteers to Monitor Drought, Climate

Weather watchers are needed to help Colorado State monitor the ongoing drought and longer-term climate conditions. The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, known as CoCoRaHS, is hoping to have at least one person per square mile recording observations along the Front Range, and as many as possible elsewhere in the state.


July 21, 2016--Groundwater discharge to Upper Colorado River Basin varies in response to drought (USGS)

The Colorado River and its tributaries provide water to more than 40 million people in seven states, irrigate more than 5.5 million acres of land, and support hydropower facilities. More than half of the total streamflow in the UCRB originates from groundwater.


July 13, 2016--National Weather Service creates new office devoted to water prediction (Forester Daily News)

In recognizing the vast and evolving water needs for millions of Americans, NOAA’s National Weather Service this week created a new office dedicated to understanding and predicting water dynamics, effective immediately.


July 12, 2016--Wind, not water, to blame for drought, says study (Water Deeply)

A new study looking at the relationship between the water cycle and California’s drought found that large-scale atmospheric circulation is a primary force behind water shortages. Since California’s most recent drought began more than four years ago, scientific studies have been helping us better understand the causes and implications.


July 9, 2016--Floating solar is a win-win energy solution for drought-stricken US lakes (Guardian)

The Colorado River’s two great reservoirs, Lake Mead and Lake Powell, are in retreat. Multi-year droughts and chronic overuse have taken their toll, to be sure, but vast quantities of water are also lost to evaporation.


July 6, 2016--Droughts of the future will not be the droughts of the past (USGS)

Due to its prevalence and implications for humans, wildlife, and ecosystems, drought is a focal research theme of the North Central Climate Science Center (NC CSC). From December 7-8, 2015, twenty-eight scientists, managers, and communicators gathered in Fort Collins, CO to discuss and synthesize the existing knowledge of climate change and ecological drought across the North Central region.


June 20, 2016--Lake Powell on upward trend despite extra water released for Lake Mead (Lake Powell News)

Runoff on the Colorado River this past week has pushed Lake Powell to its highest level in four years. When the runoff ends in early July, the lake will be near 3,620 feet above mean sea level (msl). Even though runoff in 2016 was slightly below normal it was enough to boost Lake Powell 30 feet from the spring low in April.


June 19, 2016--Lake Powell on upward trend despite extra water released for Lake Mead (Lake Powell News)

Runoff on the Colorado River this past week has pushed Lake Powell to its highest level in four years. When the runoff ends in early July, the lake will be near 3,620 feet above mean sea level (msl). Even though runoff in 2016 was slightly below normal it was enough to boost Lake Powell 30 feet from the spring low in April.


June 18, 2016--Does Arizona have enough water for the drought? (Arizona Magazine)

Although Arizona may not collectively be singing in the rain, some comfort can be had in knowing that water has been conserved with calculated intention. In fact, in Arizona State University’s 2011 “Watering the Sun Corridor” r


June 13, 2016--Making water conservation a reality (Post Independent)

In issuing his executive order back in 2013 for the creation of the first statewide water plan, Gov. John Hickenlooper stated that “every conversation about water should begin with conservation.” It may be difficult to think of water conservation now as we look out our windows at rivers and creeks swollen with spring runoff, but we need to remind ourselves of where we live.


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