Drought

Colorado Weather Program Seeks Volunteers to Monitor Drought, Climate

Weather watchers are needed to help Colorado State monitor the ongoing drought and longer-term climate conditions. The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, known as CoCoRaHS, is hoping to have at least one person per square mile recording observations along the Front Range, and as many as possible elsewhere in the state.


February 5, 2016--The most important water stories of 2015 (Huffington Post)

Water was a Top Risk on the 2015 Global Agenda: In early 2015, participants at the World Economic Forum, a who's who of the political and business elite, ranked water crises as the top global risk.


February 1, 2016--More federal resources needed to fight drought in the West (Las Vegas Sun)

The annual Colorado College Conservation in the West Poll results released in January, surveying attitudes of voters in seven Western states on conservation, environment and energy issues, shows just how much Westerners, most particularly Western Hispanics, are concerned about the ongoing drought. A significant majority of Hispanics polled considered water issues — low levels of wate


January 29, 2016--Even torrential rain brought by El Niño may not end California’s drought (Economist)

Stillness pervades the South Los Angeles Wetland Park. A turtle floats by, undisturbed by lunch hour at the high school opposite. Tall bulrushes bend around the pool at the centre of the nine-acre (3.6 hectare) site. The water comes from the city’s storm drains, cleaned of oil and rubbish.


January 15, 2016--California Governor Brown pushes big water project amid drought (Reuters)

California Governor Jerry Brown warned on Thursday of near-apocalyptic water shortages if his $15 billion plan to divert water from a Northern California river for use elsewhere gets bogged down in political and environmental disputes. The plan to remove water north of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, the fragile source of much of the state's drinking water, is opposed by many e


January 12, 2016--California drought: How will we know when it's over? (Mercury News)

Now that 2016 has gotten off to a wet start, with a series of El Niño storms drenching California in recent days, the question is turning up with increasing frequency at dinner parties and coffee shops:  "How will we know when the drought is over?" The answer, water experts say, is more complicated than you'd think. Simply put: The drought could end this year


January 9, 2016--How the feds can ensure Western states get more water in 2016 (High Country News)

This summer, as California was struggling through its fourth and most severe year of drought, two California Congressmen unveiled legislation meant to ease the pain. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D) and Rep. David Valadao (R) introduced, respectively, the California Emergency Drought Relief Act of 2015 and the Western Water and American Food Security Act of 2015.


January 6, 2016--Is the Rio Grande headed for “permanent drought”? (New Mexico In-Depth)

In the mad rush to get a jump on holiday vacation, readers probably missed the release of an important paper on water and climate change in the West. But don’t worry.


January 4, 2016--Report: Lake Mead dropping 12 feet per year (Rocky Mountain PBS)

The math is simple. So states a disarming truism in a new report from the Colorado River Research Group, formed of water scholars in four states, “an independent, scientific voice for the future of the Colorado River.” In 2007, the U.S.


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