Conservation

***Help Save the Colorado River: Pledge Now to the Change the Course Campaign!***

The freshwater team at National Geographic believes the principle of motivated individual action can help to restore the flow of the Colorado River.  Together with the Bonneville Environment Foundation and Participant Media, National Geographic has created the “Change the Course” campaign.


July 18, 2014--Drought is catalyst to reforming how we deliver water to Americans (Denver Business Journal)

For many people, news coverage of drought, low water tables, and increased pumping of aquifers are just words. The average American lacks full understanding of how the drought in the Western states affects them and the businesses they patronize.


July 18, 2014--New report recommends effective water solutions in CO River Basin (Water World)

American Rivers and Western Resource Advocates -- two authorities on Western water issues -- issued a new report that identifies conservation, reuse and other innovative solutions that could eliminate Western water shortages stemming from the over-stressed Colorado River.


July 16, 2014--State officials push for water conservation as climate change threatens (International Business Times)

California regulators are expected to pass the first-ever emergency water restrictions for the entire state. The rules, if passed, will levy fines of up to $500 a day on Californians who over-water their yards or hose down sidewalks and driveways. Scientists aren’t certain whether the now three-year-long drought is a direct result of climate change.


July 13, 2014--Another view: Busting water conservation myths (Sacramento Bee)

As a solution for California’s complex water challenges, conserving water to get more from every drop stands out for its great potential and the misconceptions around it.


July 10, 2014--Western Slope counties look to protect water resources (Summit Daily)

“No more water across the Divide” is the rallying cry of the Colorado Basin Implementation Plan. The second draft of the plan was released July 1, and over and over it calls for a stop to diversions of water from the Colorado River Basin under the Continental Divide.


July 9, 2014--Water plan would weigh new diversion projects (Post Independent)

Though Colorado River Basin water users strongly urge against any new trans-mountain diversions to the East Slope as part of a draft plan for the basin released last week, a key part of the process to create a state water plan recognizes a need to eventually have that discussion.


July 5, 2014--Pay heed to water use in climate change mitigation: Experts (Climate Change Journal)

Besides cutting greenhouse gas emissions, technology, policies or plans that aim to slow down climate change should also take environmental factors such as water usage into account, say researchers. A more integrated approach might make some options considerably more attractive than others, said Philip Wallis from Monash University in Australia.


New Program Pays Users to Conserve Colorado River Water

Farmers, cities, and power plant operators could soon be paid to cut their use of the Colorado River under a new interstate program aimed at keeping more water in Lake’s Powell and Mead. The four largest communities fed by the Colorado River will contribute millions of dollars into a fund to help farmers and industrial operations pay for efficiency improvements and conservation measures to cut their water use. Known as the Colorado River System Conservation Program, it will be seeded with $2 million each from the Central Arizona Water Conservation District, Denver Water, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, and the Southern Nevada Water Authority. Another $3 million will come from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.


California Could Save Up to 14 Million Acre-Feet of Water

According to a new analysis released by the Pacific Institute and the Natural Resources Defense Council, California could be saving up to 14 million acre-feet of untapped water--providing more than the amount of water used in all of California’s cities in one year--with an aggressive statewide effort to use water-saving practices, reuse water, and capture lost stormwater. “Our current approach to water use is unsustainable, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t enough water to meet our needs,” said Kate Poole, NRDC senior attorney with the water program. “At a time when every drop counts, we need to employ sensible and cost-effective 21st century solutions that will help us reduce uses today while promising new, resilient supplies for cities and farms tomorrow.” “As climate change brings more extreme weather, including droughts, ramping up forward-thinking solutions now will help us be more resilient,” said Peter Gleick (pictured right), president of the Pacific Institute.


Syndicate content