Conservation

Colorado WaterWise Value of Water Toolkit is Now Available!

Colorado WaterWise Value of Water Toolkit is now available! It has evolved into the new Colorado Water – Live Like You Love It program.

***Help Save the Colorado River: Pledge Now to the Change the Course Campaign!***

The freshwater team at National Geographic believes the principle of motivated individual action can help to restore the flow of the Colorado River.  Together with the Bonneville Environment Foundation and Participant Media, National Geographic has created the “Change the Course” campaign.


Homes to Recycle Water

Droughts have pushed cities, especially in the American Southwest, to strengthen efficiency mandates at every point in the water system. According to a recent Energy Collective article, Lancaster, California was one of the first municipalities to require homes to be not only solar-ready, but have recycle-ready plumbing. Innovative companies have developed systems that recycle the gray water in the home for non-potable uses (e.g., outside irrigation, toilet water, etc.). According to the article, more than 80 percent of the water used in the typical home is not used for drinking, and technology is now available that can recover 2 of every 3 gallons of a home’s gray water. Generally, these types of systems can cut the total amount of water used by a home by about one-third. 


December 28, 2015--University of Colorado scientists say reservoir evaporation a concern (Durango Herald)

 A focus should be placed on measuring and reducing reservoir evaporation in an effort to meet Colorado’s growing water supply demands, according to a study by the University of Colorado Boulder. The report, unveiled on Monday, focused on conservation, a popular theme touted by water managers across Colorado.


December 15, 2015--Water conservation initiative launched Tuesday targets West (Durango Herald)

A plan to spur investment in water conservation and infrastructure in the West through public-private collaborations, was announced Tuesday by federal officials. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said at a White House roundtable on water innovation that the department is establishing a “Natural Resource Investment Center.” Much of the goal of the investment center will


December 6, 2015--Conservation? Yes Dam storage? No (Pueblo Chieftain)

Gov. John Hickenlooper recently unveiled Colorado’s first-ever state water plan. After nearly two years of meetings and input, the ballyhoo of releasing the plan was heard from Yuma to Grand Junction. There’s good and bad in the plan, and the on-the-ground result depends on which part of the plan the state decides to implement.


December 3, 2015--State releases final version of Colorado Water Plan (Pine River Times)

Colorado now has a plan for its water supply future, motivated by the prediction of state population doubling to around 10 million people by 2050. The plan was released on Nov. 19. It contains well over 400 pages. It was initiated in May 2013 by an executive order from Gov. John Hickenlooper.


November 21, 2015--Boiling down the Colorado Water Plan’s action plan (Aspen Journal)

There are 16 pages in the Colorado Water Plan devoted to the “Critical Action Plan.” With the action plan's language lightly rinsed and boiled down, a recipe of potential solutions emerges. See below:


November 19, 2015--Colorado's Water Plan will need everyone to pitch in, officials say (Denver Post)

Colorado adopted a landmark $20 billion water plan Thursday to try to accommodate rapid population growth by conserving more, re-using more, storing more, sharing more between farmers and cities — and diverting less west-east across mountains. "Now is the time to re-think how we can be more efficient," Gov.


November 17, 2015--Colorado floats unprecendented plan to tackle water challenges (Denver Post)

Colorado officials are unveiling an unprecedented water plan, after a decade of statewide negotiations, that prioritizes water-saving in a $20 billion push to allow population growth in the face of huge projected shortfalls. State water planners on Thursday will present a roughly 480-page document to Gov.


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