Colorado

June 26, 2014--What can local governments do to protect & conserve water? (Post Independent)

As people around the state debate how to make Colorado’s limited water supplies stretch to accommodate nearly twice as many people by 2050, the topic of growth surfaces repeatedly. Some call for outright limits on population growth, while others point out that how communities grow can have as big an impact on their water use as how much they grow.


June 25, 2014--Water conservancy weighs ownership of Jackson Gulch (Cortez Journal)

The Mancos Water Conservancy District board on Thursday weighed the consequences of taking ownership of Jackson Gulch Reservoir, the dam, the canal system and the land it sits on from the federal government. If the district worked with the Bureau of Reclamation to take ownership, the district would have to take over all the contracting and inspections.


June 23, 2014--849,610 pounds of toxic chemicals released into Colorado waterways (Denver Post)

Industrial polluters released 849,610 pounds of toxic chemicals into Colorado waterways in 2012, according to a report drawn from federal data. The most prevalent chemical — nitrates — causes algae growth that leads to dead zones in rivers and streams.


June 19, 2014--In arid West, water rights are like gold (Durango Herald)

After another winter of below average snowfall, the spring runoff has dropped to a trickle on the La Plata River with most of the irrigation ditches being shut down. Our winter snows are the lifeblood for most of the agriculture that occurs in Southwest Colorado.


June 19, 2014--Ceremony marks completion of Long Hollow dam (Durango Herald)

A ceremonial load of dirt was dumped Thursday to mark the end of construction of the Long Hollow dam here. The brief topping-out observation was attended by members of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe, which helped fund construction, and Brice Lee from La Plata Water Conservancy District, which sponsored the project.


June 19, 2014--No play at Lake Nighthorse this year (Durango Herald)

The Bureau of Reclamation gave vague reassurances Wednesday that progress is being made to open Lake Nighthorse for recreation but few details. Kathleen Ozga, resource manager with the bureau’s Western Colorado area, gave an update at a public meeting at the Durango Community Recreation Center.


June 19, 2014--McPhee breakwater now has a plan (Cortez Journal)

The fate of the long-stalled breakwater project is finally inching forward, and officials are cautiously optimistic it may be ready for installation soon. A constructed breakwater at the McPhee boat ramp was supposed to be floated into position last summer, but it is still languishing near shore.


June 19, 2014--Not much love for proposed new water diversions (Summit Voice)

For all the detailed information in the 16,000-page study for Denver Water’s proposed new water diversions from the Western Slope, there are still more questions than answers, according to formal comment letters filed in the past few weeks.


June 18, 2014--Colorado's water plan is being hijacked (Denver Post)

Last year, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper wrote an executive order requiring the state to create an official Colorado water plan that would lay out how the state should manage water for the next 30 years. Unfortunately, that plan is being hijacked by dam and pipeline builders who want to dam, drain, dry up, and destroy our Colorado rivers.


June 15, 2014--Take the opportunity to make your voice heard in state’s water planning (Grand Junction Sentinel)

“Water is essential to Colorado’s quality of life and economy, but our ability to maintain those values will be challenged by a growing population, increasing demands for water, and limited supplies of this precious resource.” These words appear on the Colorado Water Conservation Board’s website, describing the need for and purpose of the proposed Colorado Water Pla


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