Colorado

August 26, 2014--In Colorado, conversation about lawn water use begins (KUNC)

As Colorado plans for a future with more people and less water, some in the world of water are turning to the problem of lawns. In the 2014 legislative session, state senator Ellen Roberts (R-Durango) introduced a bill that would limit lawns in new developments if they took water from farms.


August 24, 2014--Hickenlooper: No water brawls (Pueblo Chieftain)

Whatever else is in it, the biggest element of Colorado’s water plan will be cooperation. “Water can either divide or unite us. In the end, it’s our choice,” Gov. John Hickenlooper told the Colorado Water Congress last week.


August 22, 2014--‘No more diversions’ key message to legislative panel (Post Independent)

Protection of the river ecology and preservation of recreation and agricultural interests was the consistent message heard by a panel of Colorado legislators who convened here Thursday to gather public comments on the new state water plan.


August 22, 2014--Governor thinks new major dam project ‘unlikely’ (Aspen Times)

Gov. John Hickenlooper told members of the Colorado Water Congress on Thursday that he thinks it’s “unlikely” that public opinion in the state has shifted in favor of a new major dam project being built in the state, even in the face of population growth and drought.


August 21, 2014--Sen. Udall speaks on water conservation in Snowmass (Aspen Times)

Climate change is globally impacting natural resources, particularly water supplies, and that can’t go unchecked, U.S. Sen. Mark Udall said Wednesday in Snowmass Village.


August 20, 2014--Will Front Range growth trump river health? (Post Independent)

Climate change might not be the end-all, be-all in the state’s water discussion, but Brad Udall knows it needs to at least be a part of it.


August 17, 2014--Conservation measures take center stage (Post Independent)

Gary Bumgarner doesn’t like to hear statistics that say irrigated agriculture makes up 85 percent of Colorado’s consumptive water use. It’s misleading, he says, and as a fourth-generation Grand County rancher with senior and junior water rights, he knows a thing or two about water.


August 16, 2014--Report: Hot times ahead for Colorado (Summit Voice)

By the middle of this century, Denver’s average temperature could be 6 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than today — on par with Albuquerque, according to a new climate report released by the Colorado Water Conservation Board in early August. Even with deep cuts in greenhouse gas emissions, Colorado will continue to get warmer.


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