October 6, 2015--Sewer hurdles rising higher (Durango Herald)

The alternative site where the sewage-treatment plant could be rebuilt across from Mercury has some major flaws. The Durango Utilities Commission and members of the public pointed out some of the problems Monday after the release of a new report on the site by Mulhern MRE, a city consultant. Although the utilities commission did not make a recommendation on the site near Sawmil

October 6, 2015--How does Durango get its water? (Durango Herald)

When the river ran orange with mine waste in August, city taps still flowed with clean, usable water. To make sure Durango will have drinking water in a future emergency and to serve eventual growth, city officials would like to build a new $50 million Ridges Basin Water Treatment Plant below Lake Nighthorse. “It gives the city such great flexibility that it doesn’t

Mancos Water Conservancy District

At a September public meeting, the Mancos Water Conservancy District (MWCD) board continued discussion about obtaining title transfer of irrigation facilities from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (BOR). At the meeting they heard from two out-of-state irrigation managers who benefited from title transfer. Invited guests were Gary Esslinger, Manager for the Elephant Butte Irrigation District in New Mexico, and Tom Knutson, retired General Manager of the Farwell Irrigation District in Nebraska. Both reported that the title process was time consuming and not easy but that it was worth it in the end for their districts.

Telluride’s San Miguel River Restoration Project

In July, the Town of Telluride Open Space Commission approved nearly $1 million in funding for a project to reroute the San Miguel River back to its original course on the Valley Floor. Approximately 125 years ago, the river was channelized, or straightened, to hug the southern edge of the valley and make transportation of goods down the waterway easier. In 2008, the town purchased the Valley Floor, and one of the main goals of that purchase was to restore the river to its original, meandering course across the conservation easement west of town.

Colorado Water and Growth Dialogue

Whose job is it to worry if a city, town, or rural area's water supply is sustainable? Some believe it’s a planner’s obligation to consider the long-term security of water supply, while others contend that securing a sustainable water supply too overarching for a single planner and department. Complicating the issue is the fact that not everyone who deals in water supply and land use is on the same page. Land use planning is typically a local governmental concern, while water planning and allocation occur on multiple local, state, and federal levels. The traditional disconnect between planning and land use decisions and current and future water supply realities can preclude a sustainable balance between water supply and growth. To-these-ends, the Colorado Water Institute and the Keystone Policy Center have joined forces for a two-year project to tackle what they call the “dilemma” of water use in Colorado. The project, referred to as the Colorado Water and Growth Dialogue, is an attempt to explore and demonstrate how the integration of water and land use planning should be utilized to reduce water demand from the development and re-development associated with the projected population increases. This approach to planning aims to direct and incentivize smart, water-wise growth in lieu of allowing pure market conditions to guide how Colorado grows. 

October 5, 2015--Rains trigger flash flood watch (Durango Herald)

A flash flood watch has been issued until noon Tuesday throughout Southwest Colorado. Showers are expected to continue through Wednesday. To view the full article and report visit the Durango Herald.

October 4, 2015--State water plan is shifting the focus forward (Grand Junction Sentinel)

It has been pointed out several times that the recent mine spill into the Animas River was, in one sense, a good thing. It re-awoke the public to Colorado’s checkered mining heritage, and the damage done to our rivers for more than a century. But Colorado’s mining legacy is more than old mines polluting mountain streams.

October 3, 2015--Tipton questions Superfund status (Durango Herald)

U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton on Thursday expressed concerns with the prospect of federal officials moving forward with a Superfund listing for Silverton near the inactive Gold King Mine. A divide has emerged over the Superfund question, with some residents and officials of Silverton worried the listing would be a stain on the community.

October 3, 2015--Economic future in flux after Gold King spill (Durango Herald)

The economic stability of Southwest Colorado could be in peril, according to financial victims of the Gold King Mine spill, who spoke in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. The three speakers – representing La Plata County, Durango and Silverton interests – spoke at a hearing before the U.S. Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee.

October 2, 2015--Judge says Forest Service violated FOIA in controversial Wolf Creek land exchange (Summit Voice)

onservation advocates battling against plans for a massive resort development at Wolf Creek Pass, in southwestern Colorado, won a partial victory in federal court this week, as a judge ruled that the U.S.

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