Colorado

December 9, 2014--Southwest Basin Water Roundtable holds meetings to discuss plan (Cortez Journal)

Colorado has a difficult water problem. Eighty percent of its water is on the Western Slope, but 80 percent of its population is on the Front Range. Adding to the problem are estimates that Colorado’s population will increase from 5 million to 10 million by 2050, the majority of which will live on the Front Range.


December 9, 2014--Warm temps, El Niño pattern make ski resorts anxious (Glenwood Post Independent)

El Niño-influenced weather patterns that have brought much-needed rains to drought-stricken Southern California have also left Colorado ski resorts high and dry heading into the critical holiday season after a spate of early snowstorms allowed many ski areas to open ahead of schedule.


December 9, 2014--Reclamation announces Animas-La Plata Project contract negotiations with Southern Ute Indian Tribe (USBOR)

Reclamation's Western Colorado Area Office announced today that it will initiate negotiations with the Southern Ute Indian Tribe on a proposed contract for the Tribe’s statutory water allocation of the Animas-La Plata Project.


December 8, 2014--Colorado's first water plan 'a good first step' (Denver Business Journal)

The final draft of Colorado's first formal water plan will be delivered to Gov. John Hickenlooper this week, and it's being characterized by water experts as a "good first step" toward building state-wide consensus on what can and must be done to meet the needs of a growing population.


December 8, 2014--Farming in America shifts as cities buy up rural water rights (Water Online)

Water challenges may be shifting the landscape of U.S. agriculture. "As we continue to push Western water supplies beyond their limits, growing cities are gradually idling farmland to meet their own water needs.


December 7, 2014--Animas River trout in decline (Durango Herald)

The number of brown and rainbow trout in the Animas River swimming through Durango has declined, according to an ongoing study. In particular, a decline has been noted in fish from 32nd Street to the Lightner Creek confluence with the Animas, said Jim White an aquatic biologist with Colorado Parks and Wildlife, who worked on the fish survey.


December 4, 2014--Defense act includes Hermosa bill (Durango Herald)

The Hermosa Creek wilderness bill has been included in the National Defense Authorization Act, again raising hopes among supporters that Congress will pass the bill before the session ends. The defense act is one of the few remaining bills Congress is expected to debate this year.


December 3, 2014--Mesa Verde ponders mysterious depression (CBS)

Was it a reservoir, a ceremonial plaza, a ball court? Mesa Verde National Park in Colorado is taking a new look at a ruin known as Mummy Lake in hopes of determining how ancient Puebloans used it, The Cortez Journal reported Monday. Archaeologists disagree about the large circular depression lined by sandstone walls.


December 3, 2014--Water at forefront of legislators’ agenda (Montrose Daily Press)

Rural Coloradans need to weigh in once the state’s draft water plan is reviewed and released, Sen. Ellen Roberts told guests of the Montrose Chamber on Tuesday. “Input is critically important.


December 2, 2014--Colorado aims low in using H2O but won't set target for how low to go (Denver Post)

Water conservationists are calling on Colorado leaders to set a clear target in the state's first water plan: reduce use by 1 percent a year through 2050. But state officials crafting the plan to address a 163 billion gallon projected shortfall are reluctant to commit — even though Gov. John Hickenlooper has called conservation a priority.


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