Colorado Water Conservation Board

June 13, 2016--Making water conservation a reality (Post Independent)

In issuing his executive order back in 2013 for the creation of the first statewide water plan, Gov. John Hickenlooper stated that “every conversation about water should begin with conservation.” It may be difficult to think of water conservation now as we look out our windows at rivers and creeks swollen with spring runoff, but we need to remind ourselves of where we live.


Colorado Water Conservation Districts

In 1934, Governor Edwin Johnson proposed a state planning commission to identify statewide needs for natural resources, as well as public works projects—including water development. In 1935, he convened an advisory group known as the Committee of 17 to direct the planning commission. This provided the foundation for the Colorado Water Conservation Board (CWCB) and conservation districts. Prior to this, all matters in Colorado pertaining to water resources were under the jurisdiction of the State Engineer. Over the years, however, a feeling developed that these duties were too all-inclusive to permit proper oversight of state water resources. It was due to developing intricacies of water issues in the state that the CWCB was created in 1937. In addition, four conservation districts made up of designated geographical counties were established:


Dolores River

In December, and in an effort to become a party to the case, the Colorado River and Southwestern Water Conservation Districts (SWCD) filed a statement of opposition against the Colorado Water Conservation Board’s (CWCB) recently established (last fall) minimum in-stream flow requirements on the lower Dolores River. In should be noted that there are several in-stream flows that already exist on the Dolores River that the SWCD does not oppose. They do, however, have specific concerns about one recent in-stream flow filing on the river.


April 12, 2016--Water storage bill advances in Legislature (Durango Herald)

The Colorado House on Tuesday gave initial support to a measure that would require a study of water storage in Colorado. Rep. J.


April 6, 2016--Efforts to bring Lake Nighthorse water to the thirsty begin (Durango Herald)

After years of planning, a key constituent to water security in southwest La Plata County is on its way. A 4.6-mile pipeline that will carry water from Lake Nighthorse to Lake Durango went to bid March 31, and construction is expected to start within a month. “That side of the county really needs help, and that’s what La Plata West is going to do,” said Mardi Gebhard


April 2, 2016--Lawsuit filed on Dolores River standard (Durango Herald)

The Southwestern Water Conservancy District has filed a legal challenge in water court against a new minimum flow requirement for the Lower Dolores River established by the state last year. In September, the Colorado Water Conservation Board agreed to establish minimum in-stream flows up to 900 cubic feet per second in spring on the Dolores River between the confluence of the San Miguel Ri


March 12, 2016--SWSI 2016 to look at variability in future supply (Pueblo Chieftain)

Still gazing at the ripples cast by Colorado’s Water Plan, the Colorado Water Conservation Board is getting ready to dive into another wave of the future. The board is preparing to update the Statewide Water Supply Initiative, which first outlined projected water needs of the state in 2004 and was updated in 2010. The document now serves as the technical basis for


March 8, 2016--West Slope lawmakers push for more storage of water on East Slope (Grand Junction Sentinel)

A Western Slope lawmaker wants to help folks on the eastern side of the state store more water. Doing so not only would help serve the growing water demands of thirsty Front Range cities, but also take pressure off other areas of the state from transmountain diversions, said Rep. J. Paul Brown, R-Ignacio. Brown, along with Sen.


February 28, 2016--Colorado water officials discuss statewide tap fee (Aspen Daily News)

State water officials at the Colorado Water Conservation Board are looking for $100 million a year from a new and reliable source of public funding to help build water projects and programs in Colorado over the next 30 years. “A dedicated statewide funding source of some kind, outside of existing funding, is probably going to be needed in order to make some of this reality,” Ti


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